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CONGENITAL THROMBOCYTOPENIA

CONGENITAL THROMBOCYTOPENIA Rushmore1 in 1925 reviewed the literature on purpura as a complication of pregnancy and listed six cases, his own making seven, in which the fetus showed symptoms similar to those shown by the mother. Liebling,2 Waltner3 and Conti4 each added another case. Siegler5 reported a case of purpura in pregnancy, in which the infant died four days after birth. From the history, there did not appear to be any symptoms in the infant that might warrant the diagnosis "probably purpura hemorrhagica." All these reports were made from a purely obstetric standpoint, and only casual mention was made of the infant. Greenwald and Sherman6 made the first study of the condition from the pediatric standpoint. Their report was particularly valuable because of their thorough histologic study. Unfortunately they were not able to study the mother, but as purpura developed in the child from the tenth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970170110009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rushmore1 in 1925 reviewed the literature on purpura as a complication of pregnancy and listed six cases, his own making seven, in which the fetus showed symptoms similar to those shown by the mother. Liebling,2 Waltner3 and Conti4 each added another case. Siegler5 reported a case of purpura in pregnancy, in which the infant died four days after birth. From the history, there did not appear to be any symptoms in the infant that might warrant the diagnosis "probably purpura hemorrhagica." All these reports were made from a purely obstetric standpoint, and only casual mention was made of the infant. Greenwald and Sherman6 made the first study of the condition from the pediatric standpoint. Their report was particularly valuable because of their thorough histologic study. Unfortunately they were not able to study the mother, but as purpura developed in the child from the tenth

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1936

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