Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CONGENITAL STATIONARY NIGHT BLINDNESS WITHOUT OPHTHALMOSCOPIC OR OTHER ABNORMALITIES

CONGENITAL STATIONARY NIGHT BLINDNESS WITHOUT OPHTHALMOSCOPIC OR OTHER ABNORMALITIES Abstract PRIMARY chorioretinal aberrations with night blindness was the subject of a symposium1 at the 1949 meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. The first abnormality considered in that symposium, and the subject of this paper, was characterized by one of us (F. D. C.) as night blindness present at birth, stationary, occurring in an approximately equal number of males and females, and with no associated abnormalities. Bell2 collected 19 pedigrees of this disease.3 A few sporadic cases have probably been encountered in the examination of candidates for the air force in this country4 and in Canada,5 and Langdon,6 in 1915, reported the cases of a father and daughter in Philadelphia who had a reduced light sense and normal fundi. Except for Langdon's observation, however, we believe that the following report is the first to record a family affected typically with this abnormality References 1. Leinfelder, P. J.; Carroll, F. D.; Falls, H. F.; Cogan, D. G.; Fralick, F. B., and Duke-Elder, W. S.: Symposium: Primary Chorioretinal Aberrations with Night Blindness; Classification , Tr. Am. Acad. Ophth. 54:607, 1950. 2. Bell, J.: Treasury of Human Inheritance , London, Cambridge University Press, 1922, Vol. 2, Pt. 1, p. 29. 3. Riddell, W. J. B.: A Pedigree of Hereditary Stationary Sex-Linked Night Blindness , Ann. Eugenics 10:326, 1940Crossref 4. Two Clinical Tests for Night Blindness , Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 60:181, 1940. 5. Gates, R. R.: Human Genetics , New York, The Macmillan Company, 1946, Vol. 1, p. 221. 6. Truc, H.: Opin un ancien foyer d'héméralopia nongarienne , Arch. opht. 42: 481, 1925. 7. Sinclair, W. W.: Hereditary Congenital Night Blindness Without Visible Ophthalmoscopic Changes , Ophth. Rev. 24:255, 1905. 8. Hudson, A.: Notes on a Case of Congenital Night Blindness , South African M. Rec. 1:73, 1903. 9. McDonald, R.: Personal communication to the authors. 10. McCullough, C.: Personal communication to the authors. 11. Langdon, H. M.: Hereditary Deficiency of the Light Sense in Otherwise Healthy Eyes, with Report of a Case , Ann. Ophth. & Otol. 24:469, 1915. 12. Bordley, J. J.: A Family of Hemeralopes , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 19:278, 1908. 13. Newman, H. H.: Five Generations of Congenital Stationary Night Blindness in an American Family , J. Genetics 3:25-28, 1913. 14. Nettleship, E.: A History of Congenital Stationary Night Blindness in 9 Consecutive Generations , Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 27:269, 1907. 15. Dejean, C., and Gassenc, R.: Note sur la généalogie de la famille Nougaret de Vendémian , Bull. Soc. opht. France 1:96-100, 1949. 16. Jayle, G. E., and Ourgaud, A.: La vision nocturne et ses troubles , Paris, Masson & Cie, 1950. 17. Sorsby, A.: Genetics in Ophthalmology , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1951, p. 7. 18. Dr. LeGrand Hardy, Dr. Gertrude Rand, and Miss Catherine Rittler, of the Arnold Knapp Laboratory of Physiological Optics, Institute of Ophthalmology, New York, assisted in this phase of the study. 19. Purkinje, J. E.: Beobachtungen in Versuche zur Physiologie der Sinne, 1823, p. 118. 20. Adler, F. H.: Physiology of the Eye: Clinical Application , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1950, p. 645. 21. The tests were performed by Dr. G. Rand, Department of Physiological Optics, Institute of Ophthalmology. 22. Riggs, L. A., and Johnson, E. P.: Electrical Responses of the Human Retina , J. Exper. Psychol. 39:415, 1949. 23. Riggs, L. A.; Berry, R. N., and Wayner, M.: A Comparison of Electrical and Psychophysical Determination of the Spectral Sensitivity of the Human Eye , J. Optic. Soc. America 39:427, 1949. 24. Johnson, E. P.: Electrical Response of the Human Retina During Dark Adaptation , J. Exper. Psychol. 39:597, 1949. 25. Riggs, L. A. : Personal communication to the authors. 26. Riggs, L. A.: To be published. 27. Hecht, S., and Shlaer, S.: An Adaptometer for Measuring Human Dark Adaptation , J. Optic. Soc. America 28:269, 1938. 28. Haig, C., and Lewis, J. M.: Simple Method of Measuring Brightness Threshold of Dark Adapted Eyes at All Ages , Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med. 41:415, 1939. 29. Hecht, S., and Mandelbaum, J.: The Relation Between Vitamin A and Dark Adaptation , J. A. M. A. 112:1910, 1939. 30. Wald, G.: Human Vision and the Spectrum , Science 101:653, 1945. 31. Haig, C., and Haig, E. M.: Retinal Sensitivity Contours, Abstracts of Communications of XVII th International Physiological Congress, Oxford, 1947. 32. Hartridge, H.: Recent Advances in the Physiology of Vision , Philadelphia, The Blakiston Company, 1950. 33. Hecht, S.; Haig, C., and Chase, A. M. : Influence of Light Adaptation on Subsequent Dark Adaptation of the Eye , J. Gen. Physiol. 20:831, 1937. 34. Haig and Haig.23 Haig, C.: The Intensity Limen in Relation to Rod and Cone Cross-Sectional Areas and Population Densities in Same and Different Retinal Regions, Abstracts of Communications, Eighteenth International Physiological Congress, Copenhagen, 1950 35. Spring, K. H., and Stiles, W. S. : Apparent Shape and Size of the Pupil Viewed Obliquely , Brit. J. Ophth. 32:347, 1948. 36. Haig, C.: The Intensity Limen in Relation to Rod and Cone Cross-Sectional Areas and Population Densities in Same and Different Retinal Regions, Abstracts of Communications of XVIIIth International Physiological Congress, Copenhagen, 1950. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

CONGENITAL STATIONARY NIGHT BLINDNESS WITHOUT OPHTHALMOSCOPIC OR OTHER ABNORMALITIES

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/congenital-stationary-night-blindness-without-ophthalmoscopic-or-other-NkGOgg3Taw
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1953.00920030038006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract PRIMARY chorioretinal aberrations with night blindness was the subject of a symposium1 at the 1949 meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. The first abnormality considered in that symposium, and the subject of this paper, was characterized by one of us (F. D. C.) as night blindness present at birth, stationary, occurring in an approximately equal number of males and females, and with no associated abnormalities. Bell2 collected 19 pedigrees of this disease.3 A few sporadic cases have probably been encountered in the examination of candidates for the air force in this country4 and in Canada,5 and Langdon,6 in 1915, reported the cases of a father and daughter in Philadelphia who had a reduced light sense and normal fundi. Except for Langdon's observation, however, we believe that the following report is the first to record a family affected typically with this abnormality References 1. Leinfelder, P. J.; Carroll, F. D.; Falls, H. F.; Cogan, D. G.; Fralick, F. B., and Duke-Elder, W. S.: Symposium: Primary Chorioretinal Aberrations with Night Blindness; Classification , Tr. Am. Acad. Ophth. 54:607, 1950. 2. Bell, J.: Treasury of Human Inheritance , London, Cambridge University Press, 1922, Vol. 2, Pt. 1, p. 29. 3. Riddell, W. J. B.: A Pedigree of Hereditary Stationary Sex-Linked Night Blindness , Ann. Eugenics 10:326, 1940Crossref 4. Two Clinical Tests for Night Blindness , Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 60:181, 1940. 5. Gates, R. R.: Human Genetics , New York, The Macmillan Company, 1946, Vol. 1, p. 221. 6. Truc, H.: Opin un ancien foyer d'héméralopia nongarienne , Arch. opht. 42: 481, 1925. 7. Sinclair, W. W.: Hereditary Congenital Night Blindness Without Visible Ophthalmoscopic Changes , Ophth. Rev. 24:255, 1905. 8. Hudson, A.: Notes on a Case of Congenital Night Blindness , South African M. Rec. 1:73, 1903. 9. McDonald, R.: Personal communication to the authors. 10. McCullough, C.: Personal communication to the authors. 11. Langdon, H. M.: Hereditary Deficiency of the Light Sense in Otherwise Healthy Eyes, with Report of a Case , Ann. Ophth. & Otol. 24:469, 1915. 12. Bordley, J. J.: A Family of Hemeralopes , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 19:278, 1908. 13. Newman, H. H.: Five Generations of Congenital Stationary Night Blindness in an American Family , J. Genetics 3:25-28, 1913. 14. Nettleship, E.: A History of Congenital Stationary Night Blindness in 9 Consecutive Generations , Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 27:269, 1907. 15. Dejean, C., and Gassenc, R.: Note sur la généalogie de la famille Nougaret de Vendémian , Bull. Soc. opht. France 1:96-100, 1949. 16. Jayle, G. E., and Ourgaud, A.: La vision nocturne et ses troubles , Paris, Masson & Cie, 1950. 17. Sorsby, A.: Genetics in Ophthalmology , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1951, p. 7. 18. Dr. LeGrand Hardy, Dr. Gertrude Rand, and Miss Catherine Rittler, of the Arnold Knapp Laboratory of Physiological Optics, Institute of Ophthalmology, New York, assisted in this phase of the study. 19. Purkinje, J. E.: Beobachtungen in Versuche zur Physiologie der Sinne, 1823, p. 118. 20. Adler, F. H.: Physiology of the Eye: Clinical Application , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1950, p. 645. 21. The tests were performed by Dr. G. Rand, Department of Physiological Optics, Institute of Ophthalmology. 22. Riggs, L. A., and Johnson, E. P.: Electrical Responses of the Human Retina , J. Exper. Psychol. 39:415, 1949. 23. Riggs, L. A.; Berry, R. N., and Wayner, M.: A Comparison of Electrical and Psychophysical Determination of the Spectral Sensitivity of the Human Eye , J. Optic. Soc. America 39:427, 1949. 24. Johnson, E. P.: Electrical Response of the Human Retina During Dark Adaptation , J. Exper. Psychol. 39:597, 1949. 25. Riggs, L. A. : Personal communication to the authors. 26. Riggs, L. A.: To be published. 27. Hecht, S., and Shlaer, S.: An Adaptometer for Measuring Human Dark Adaptation , J. Optic. Soc. America 28:269, 1938. 28. Haig, C., and Lewis, J. M.: Simple Method of Measuring Brightness Threshold of Dark Adapted Eyes at All Ages , Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med. 41:415, 1939. 29. Hecht, S., and Mandelbaum, J.: The Relation Between Vitamin A and Dark Adaptation , J. A. M. A. 112:1910, 1939. 30. Wald, G.: Human Vision and the Spectrum , Science 101:653, 1945. 31. Haig, C., and Haig, E. M.: Retinal Sensitivity Contours, Abstracts of Communications of XVII th International Physiological Congress, Oxford, 1947. 32. Hartridge, H.: Recent Advances in the Physiology of Vision , Philadelphia, The Blakiston Company, 1950. 33. Hecht, S.; Haig, C., and Chase, A. M. : Influence of Light Adaptation on Subsequent Dark Adaptation of the Eye , J. Gen. Physiol. 20:831, 1937. 34. Haig and Haig.23 Haig, C.: The Intensity Limen in Relation to Rod and Cone Cross-Sectional Areas and Population Densities in Same and Different Retinal Regions, Abstracts of Communications, Eighteenth International Physiological Congress, Copenhagen, 1950 35. Spring, K. H., and Stiles, W. S. : Apparent Shape and Size of the Pupil Viewed Obliquely , Brit. J. Ophth. 32:347, 1948. 36. Haig, C.: The Intensity Limen in Relation to Rod and Cone Cross-Sectional Areas and Population Densities in Same and Different Retinal Regions, Abstracts of Communications of XVIIIth International Physiological Congress, Copenhagen, 1950.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1953

References