Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CONGENITAL ATRESIA OF THE ESOPHAGUS WITH TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FISTULA

CONGENITAL ATRESIA OF THE ESOPHAGUS WITH TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FISTULA We wish to present this case because of significant diagnostic criteria not mentioned in previous reports of this rare anomaly and also because the condition was masked by symptoms referable to a suspected enlargement of the thymus gland. We are fortunate in having complete data on the antemortem and postmortem observations. This case falls definitely into the third category of Ballantyne's1 classification. REPORT OF CASE History.—Baby E., a boy, lived for eight days. He was a first child and was delivered normally. The symptoms were aerophagia, dyspnea, cyanosis, retraction of the intercostal space and of the suprasternal notch, bubbling of mucus and full and pulsating fontanels. He was unable to swallow or retain food. The infant was referred from the service of Dr. Jacob Walker with a clinical diagnosis of suspected enlargement of the thymus gland. A cursory inspection of the wet roentgen films revealed bilateral lobation of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

CONGENITAL ATRESIA OF THE ESOPHAGUS WITH TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FISTULA

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/congenital-atresia-of-the-esophagus-with-tracheobronchial-fistula-tFqOzyfvfv
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1936.01970170115010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We wish to present this case because of significant diagnostic criteria not mentioned in previous reports of this rare anomaly and also because the condition was masked by symptoms referable to a suspected enlargement of the thymus gland. We are fortunate in having complete data on the antemortem and postmortem observations. This case falls definitely into the third category of Ballantyne's1 classification. REPORT OF CASE History.—Baby E., a boy, lived for eight days. He was a first child and was delivered normally. The symptoms were aerophagia, dyspnea, cyanosis, retraction of the intercostal space and of the suprasternal notch, bubbling of mucus and full and pulsating fontanels. He was unable to swallow or retain food. The infant was referred from the service of Dr. Jacob Walker with a clinical diagnosis of suspected enlargement of the thymus gland. A cursory inspection of the wet roentgen films revealed bilateral lobation of

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1936

There are no references for this article.