Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Confusion After Topical Use of Resorcinol

Confusion After Topical Use of Resorcinol Abstract Resorcinol, in low concentrations (1% to 2%), is included in many antiseptic and keratolytic topical medications. It is sometimes used at higher concentrations as a peeling agent (a peeling paste usually contains 40% of the drug) for the treatment of acne vulgaris.1 Systemic effects of resorcinol are similar to those of phenol, particularly on the central nervous system. We report a case of confusion after percutaneous absorption of resorcinol with positive rechallenge. Report of a Case. A 28-year-old woman without a neurologic history was treated for 3 days for acne vulgaris involving the entire back with the following preparation: resorcinol, 80 g; axonge benzoin, 56 g; colloidal silica, 4 g; and zinc oxide, 20 g.This paste was a magistral preparation dispensed by her pharmacist. Following each of three applications, she presented with confusion, postcritical amnesia, and tremors; she was disoriented and had vacant stare, but no clonism.Rechallenge References 1. Wuthrich B, Zabrodsky S, Storck H. Percutaneous poisoning by resorcinol, salicylic acid, and ammoniated mercury . Pharm Acta Helv. 1972;45:453. 2. Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, Lagier G. Unexpected or toxic drug reaction assessment (imputation) . Therapie. 1985;40:115-118. 3. Cunningham AA. Resorcin poisoning . Arch Dis Child. 1956;31:173.Crossref 4. Yeung D, Kantor S, Nacht S, Gans EH. Percutaneous absorption, blood levels, and urinary excretion of resorcinol applied topically in humans . Int J Dermatol. 1983;22:321-324.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Confusion After Topical Use of Resorcinol

Confusion After Topical Use of Resorcinol

Abstract

Abstract Resorcinol, in low concentrations (1% to 2%), is included in many antiseptic and keratolytic topical medications. It is sometimes used at higher concentrations as a peeling agent (a peeling paste usually contains 40% of the drug) for the treatment of acne vulgaris.1 Systemic effects of resorcinol are similar to those of phenol, particularly on the central nervous system. We report a case of confusion after percutaneous absorption of resorcinol with positive rechallenge. Report of a...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/confusion-after-topical-use-of-resorcinol-DTpoVQeN2s
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1995.01690130116031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Resorcinol, in low concentrations (1% to 2%), is included in many antiseptic and keratolytic topical medications. It is sometimes used at higher concentrations as a peeling agent (a peeling paste usually contains 40% of the drug) for the treatment of acne vulgaris.1 Systemic effects of resorcinol are similar to those of phenol, particularly on the central nervous system. We report a case of confusion after percutaneous absorption of resorcinol with positive rechallenge. Report of a Case. A 28-year-old woman without a neurologic history was treated for 3 days for acne vulgaris involving the entire back with the following preparation: resorcinol, 80 g; axonge benzoin, 56 g; colloidal silica, 4 g; and zinc oxide, 20 g.This paste was a magistral preparation dispensed by her pharmacist. Following each of three applications, she presented with confusion, postcritical amnesia, and tremors; she was disoriented and had vacant stare, but no clonism.Rechallenge References 1. Wuthrich B, Zabrodsky S, Storck H. Percutaneous poisoning by resorcinol, salicylic acid, and ammoniated mercury . Pharm Acta Helv. 1972;45:453. 2. Bégaud B, Evreux JC, Jouglard J, Lagier G. Unexpected or toxic drug reaction assessment (imputation) . Therapie. 1985;40:115-118. 3. Cunningham AA. Resorcin poisoning . Arch Dis Child. 1956;31:173.Crossref 4. Yeung D, Kantor S, Nacht S, Gans EH. Percutaneous absorption, blood levels, and urinary excretion of resorcinol applied topically in humans . Int J Dermatol. 1983;22:321-324.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References