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Conductive High-Tone Hearing Loss

Conductive High-Tone Hearing Loss Abstract In purely conductive hearing impairments the audiometric pattern of the air-conduction threshold is flat or slightly rising, whereas sensorineural impairment frequently shows an increase in the hearing loss at higher frequencies. This study shows that purely conductive defects due to discontinuity of the ossicular chain, can, under certain conditions, imitate the audiometric pattern of a high-tone sensorineural hearing loss. It is important that this type of conductive defect be recognized and not misinterpreted as sensory hearing loss. The presence of specific organic conductive defects can be demonstrated by Weber's lateralization test, and objective verification of the defect is best obtained by the acoustic stapedius reflex test and tympanometric measurement. References 1. Goodhill V: External conductive hypacusis and the fixed malleus syndrome . Acta Otolaryng , (suppl 217) , pp 1-43, 1966. 2. Anderson H, Holmgren L, Hoist H-E: Experiments with an objective method of testing the middle ear function . Acta Otolaryng 46:381-385, 1956.Crossref 3. Klockhoff I: Middle ear muscle reflexes in man . Acta Otolaryng , (suppl 164) , pp 1-92, 1961. 4. Anderson H: Acoustic Intra-Aural Reflexes in Clinical Diagnosis, thesis. Karolinska Institute, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, 1969. 5. Chandler JR: Partial occlusion of the external auditory meatus: Its effect upon air and bone conduction hearing acuity . Laryngoscope 74:22-54, 1964.Crossref 6. Anderson H, Barr B: Conductive recruitment . Acta Otolaryng 62:171-184, 1966.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Conductive High-Tone Hearing Loss

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 93 (6) – Jun 1, 1971

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1971 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1971.00770060901010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In purely conductive hearing impairments the audiometric pattern of the air-conduction threshold is flat or slightly rising, whereas sensorineural impairment frequently shows an increase in the hearing loss at higher frequencies. This study shows that purely conductive defects due to discontinuity of the ossicular chain, can, under certain conditions, imitate the audiometric pattern of a high-tone sensorineural hearing loss. It is important that this type of conductive defect be recognized and not misinterpreted as sensory hearing loss. The presence of specific organic conductive defects can be demonstrated by Weber's lateralization test, and objective verification of the defect is best obtained by the acoustic stapedius reflex test and tympanometric measurement. References 1. Goodhill V: External conductive hypacusis and the fixed malleus syndrome . Acta Otolaryng , (suppl 217) , pp 1-43, 1966. 2. Anderson H, Holmgren L, Hoist H-E: Experiments with an objective method of testing the middle ear function . Acta Otolaryng 46:381-385, 1956.Crossref 3. Klockhoff I: Middle ear muscle reflexes in man . Acta Otolaryng , (suppl 164) , pp 1-92, 1961. 4. Anderson H: Acoustic Intra-Aural Reflexes in Clinical Diagnosis, thesis. Karolinska Institute, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, 1969. 5. Chandler JR: Partial occlusion of the external auditory meatus: Its effect upon air and bone conduction hearing acuity . Laryngoscope 74:22-54, 1964.Crossref 6. Anderson H, Barr B: Conductive recruitment . Acta Otolaryng 62:171-184, 1966.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1971

References