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Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression Inventory Not Ready for Prime Time

Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression Inventory Not Ready for Prime Time Letters COMMENT & RESPONSE comparative severity profiles across clinical sites. Thatisase- rious problem for multicenter research efforts. Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression Inventory Looking past the impressive mathematics, CAT-DI is re- Not Ready for Prime Time dundant. Rather than speeding assessment, it adds extra bur- To the Editor The Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression In- den with no clinical gain. Because it does not reliably record ventory (CAT-DI) is a tour de force of computing that lacks clini- key symptoms, it cannot verify DSM-IV depression diagno- cal grounding. Clinicians do not need another scale to screen ses casewise; no discriminant validity data support a use in “di- 1 2,3 for depression using 7 to 22 items. Existing scales do that well agnostic screening,” and key indicators of psychometric per- with 10 to 12 items and, unlike CAT-DI, provide a symptom formance are unstated. The goal of commercial development crosswalk to DSM-IV criteria. CAT-DI does not deliver clini- seems premature; patients risk being “assayed” against a non– cally useful symptom profiles: exemplar case 2 (Table 3 in the gold standard. Though CAT-DI may have been an interesting Gibbons et al article ) was not assessed for sleep, appetite, con- statistical challenge, it lacks a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Psychiatry American Medical Association

Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression Inventory Not Ready for Prime Time

JAMA Psychiatry , Volume 70 (7) – Jul 1, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-622X
eISSN
2168-6238
DOI
10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.1318
pmid
23824048
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters COMMENT & RESPONSE comparative severity profiles across clinical sites. Thatisase- rious problem for multicenter research efforts. Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression Inventory Looking past the impressive mathematics, CAT-DI is re- Not Ready for Prime Time dundant. Rather than speeding assessment, it adds extra bur- To the Editor The Computerized Adaptive Test–Depression In- den with no clinical gain. Because it does not reliably record ventory (CAT-DI) is a tour de force of computing that lacks clini- key symptoms, it cannot verify DSM-IV depression diagno- cal grounding. Clinicians do not need another scale to screen ses casewise; no discriminant validity data support a use in “di- 1 2,3 for depression using 7 to 22 items. Existing scales do that well agnostic screening,” and key indicators of psychometric per- with 10 to 12 items and, unlike CAT-DI, provide a symptom formance are unstated. The goal of commercial development crosswalk to DSM-IV criteria. CAT-DI does not deliver clini- seems premature; patients risk being “assayed” against a non– cally useful symptom profiles: exemplar case 2 (Table 3 in the gold standard. Though CAT-DI may have been an interesting Gibbons et al article ) was not assessed for sleep, appetite, con- statistical challenge, it lacks a

Journal

JAMA PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 2013

References