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Computer-Assisted Interview of Patients With Functional Headache

Computer-Assisted Interview of Patients With Functional Headache Abstract A computer-based, self-administered, interactive questionnaire has been designed for interview and diagnosis of patients with functional headaches. Patients respond on a simple keyboard to a sequence of questions on a cathode-ray oscilloscope. The system selects pertinent questions depending on the patient's individual responses. The questionnaire included clinical symptoms, neurological manifestations, prior treatment, emotional factors, and personality problems. Upon completion, a computer-generated printed summary is presented for the clinical record. The system utilizes the acquired data to differentiate between common, classical, and cluster migraine, muscle contraction, and other types of headache. Computer diagnoses agreed with those of the physician in 36 of 50 patients. The automated interview saves physician's time, offers a data base for research, and provides a diagnostic aid for patients with functional headaches. References 1. Slack WV, Hicks GP, Van Cura LJ: A computer-based medical history system. New Eng J Med 247:194-198, 1966.Crossref 2. Freemon FR: Computer diagnosis of headache. Headache 8:49-55, 1968.Crossref 3. Slack WV, Van Cura LJ: Patient reaction to computer-based medical interviewing. Comput Biomed Res 1:527-531, 1968.Crossref 4. Ad Hoc Committee on Classification of Headache: A classification of headache. JAMA 179:717-720, 1962.Crossref 5. Barnett GO, Grossman J, in Budd MA et al (eds): The Acquisition of Medical Histories by Questionnaire . Washington, DC, National Center for Health Services Research and Development Publication, 1970. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Computer-Assisted Interview of Patients With Functional Headache

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.00320060098012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract A computer-based, self-administered, interactive questionnaire has been designed for interview and diagnosis of patients with functional headaches. Patients respond on a simple keyboard to a sequence of questions on a cathode-ray oscilloscope. The system selects pertinent questions depending on the patient's individual responses. The questionnaire included clinical symptoms, neurological manifestations, prior treatment, emotional factors, and personality problems. Upon completion, a computer-generated printed summary is presented for the clinical record. The system utilizes the acquired data to differentiate between common, classical, and cluster migraine, muscle contraction, and other types of headache. Computer diagnoses agreed with those of the physician in 36 of 50 patients. The automated interview saves physician's time, offers a data base for research, and provides a diagnostic aid for patients with functional headaches. References 1. Slack WV, Hicks GP, Van Cura LJ: A computer-based medical history system. New Eng J Med 247:194-198, 1966.Crossref 2. Freemon FR: Computer diagnosis of headache. Headache 8:49-55, 1968.Crossref 3. Slack WV, Van Cura LJ: Patient reaction to computer-based medical interviewing. Comput Biomed Res 1:527-531, 1968.Crossref 4. Ad Hoc Committee on Classification of Headache: A classification of headache. JAMA 179:717-720, 1962.Crossref 5. Barnett GO, Grossman J, in Budd MA et al (eds): The Acquisition of Medical Histories by Questionnaire . Washington, DC, National Center for Health Services Research and Development Publication, 1970.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1972

References