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Complications of Radical Neck Dissection

Complications of Radical Neck Dissection Abstract NECK dissections are most commonly performed as a part of a combined resection of both the primary lesion and regional lymph nodes, and it is with these combined operations that the great majority of complications occur. The potential for complication varies with the presence of preoperative irradiation as well as with the amount of radiation given and the method and type of radiotherapy. Patients irradiated more than six months prior to surgery have the greatest number of complications. Tissues are most favorable for operation three weeks following the completion of radiotherapy because fibrosis and endarteritis are minimal and tumor regression is maximal. Thus a lower complication rate is expected if surgery is performed within three to six weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Radium, cobalt 60, and conventional 200 kv therapy provide higher risk potential than does supravoltage therapy because the latter causes less tissue destruction.1,2 Complications which will References 1. Vandenberg, H.J., et al: Comparison of Wound Healing Between Irradiated and Nonirradiated Patients After Radical Neck Dissection , Amer J Surg 110:557-561 ( (Oct) ) 1965.Crossref 2. Stark, R.B.: Immediate Complications of Head and Neck Surgery , Surg Clin N Amer 44:305-311 ( (April) ) 1964. 3. Nabre, M.O.: Clinical Stage Classification of Malignant Tumors of the Larynx at the UNIO International Contra Cancium, 1960, pp 1865-1873. 4. Goldman, J.L., et al: Combined Irradiation and Surgery for Cancer of the Larynx and Laryngopharynx , International Workshop on Cancer of Head and Neck, New York, (May) 1965. 5. Corgill, D.: Complications of Neck Dissections , International Workshop on Cancer of Head and Neck, New York, May 1965. 6. King, E.D.: Radical Head and Neck Surgery in Irradiated Patients , Surg Clin N Amer 45:567-572 ( (June) ) 1965. 7. Tamoney, H.J.: Transverse Incisions for Radical Neck Dissection , Surgery 60:260-263 ( (Aug) ) 1966. 8. Conley, J.J.: The Use of Regional Flaps in Head and Neck Surgery , Ann Otol 69:1223-1234 ( (Dec) ) 1960. 9. Follette, W.J.: Management of Complications of Head and Neck Surgery , Laryngoscope 76:1949-1970 ( (Dec) ) 1966.Crossref 10. Corso, P.F., and Gerold, F.P.: Use of Autogenous Dermis for Protection of the Carotid Artery and Pharyngeal Suture Lines in Radical Head and Neck Surgery , Surg Gynec Obstet 117:37-40 ( (July) ) 1963. 11. Ketchum, A.S., and Hoye, R.C.: Spontaneous Carotid Artery Hemorrhage After Head and Neck Surgery , Amer J Surg 110:649-655 ( (Oct) ) 1965.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Complications of Radical Neck Dissection

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 88 (2) – Aug 1, 1968

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1968.00770010182014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract NECK dissections are most commonly performed as a part of a combined resection of both the primary lesion and regional lymph nodes, and it is with these combined operations that the great majority of complications occur. The potential for complication varies with the presence of preoperative irradiation as well as with the amount of radiation given and the method and type of radiotherapy. Patients irradiated more than six months prior to surgery have the greatest number of complications. Tissues are most favorable for operation three weeks following the completion of radiotherapy because fibrosis and endarteritis are minimal and tumor regression is maximal. Thus a lower complication rate is expected if surgery is performed within three to six weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Radium, cobalt 60, and conventional 200 kv therapy provide higher risk potential than does supravoltage therapy because the latter causes less tissue destruction.1,2 Complications which will References 1. Vandenberg, H.J., et al: Comparison of Wound Healing Between Irradiated and Nonirradiated Patients After Radical Neck Dissection , Amer J Surg 110:557-561 ( (Oct) ) 1965.Crossref 2. Stark, R.B.: Immediate Complications of Head and Neck Surgery , Surg Clin N Amer 44:305-311 ( (April) ) 1964. 3. Nabre, M.O.: Clinical Stage Classification of Malignant Tumors of the Larynx at the UNIO International Contra Cancium, 1960, pp 1865-1873. 4. Goldman, J.L., et al: Combined Irradiation and Surgery for Cancer of the Larynx and Laryngopharynx , International Workshop on Cancer of Head and Neck, New York, (May) 1965. 5. Corgill, D.: Complications of Neck Dissections , International Workshop on Cancer of Head and Neck, New York, May 1965. 6. King, E.D.: Radical Head and Neck Surgery in Irradiated Patients , Surg Clin N Amer 45:567-572 ( (June) ) 1965. 7. Tamoney, H.J.: Transverse Incisions for Radical Neck Dissection , Surgery 60:260-263 ( (Aug) ) 1966. 8. Conley, J.J.: The Use of Regional Flaps in Head and Neck Surgery , Ann Otol 69:1223-1234 ( (Dec) ) 1960. 9. Follette, W.J.: Management of Complications of Head and Neck Surgery , Laryngoscope 76:1949-1970 ( (Dec) ) 1966.Crossref 10. Corso, P.F., and Gerold, F.P.: Use of Autogenous Dermis for Protection of the Carotid Artery and Pharyngeal Suture Lines in Radical Head and Neck Surgery , Surg Gynec Obstet 117:37-40 ( (July) ) 1963. 11. Ketchum, A.S., and Hoye, R.C.: Spontaneous Carotid Artery Hemorrhage After Head and Neck Surgery , Amer J Surg 110:649-655 ( (Oct) ) 1965.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1968

References

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