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Complications Associated With Thoracentesis-Reply

Complications Associated With Thoracentesis-Reply Abstract In Reply.— We appreciate Dr Duvall sharing his experience regarding the use of a 14-gauge angiocatheter in performing a thoracentesis. Although he has found this procedure relatively safe in terms of pneumothorax, he does not state the incidence of the other complications, namely, dry tap and insufficient amount, that place the patient at increased risk for morbidity because of the need for further studies. He also does not indicate the surveillance method used by him to determine the complication rate.A 14-gauge angiocatheter may be a safe method for performing a thoracentesis, but it has not been proved so in a randomized, prospective study. Our study1 demonstrated that the needle catheter technique, when used by physicians in training, is complicated by a substantial rate of pneumothorax. This method had been previously accepted at our institution as the method of choice for performing a thoracentesis. We feel that any thoracentesis References 1. Grogan DR, Irwin RS, Channick R, et al. Complications associated with thoracentesis: a prospective, randomized study comparing three different methods . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:873-877.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Complications Associated With Thoracentesis-Reply

Complications Associated With Thoracentesis-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— We appreciate Dr Duvall sharing his experience regarding the use of a 14-gauge angiocatheter in performing a thoracentesis. Although he has found this procedure relatively safe in terms of pneumothorax, he does not state the incidence of the other complications, namely, dry tap and insufficient amount, that place the patient at increased risk for morbidity because of the need for further studies. He also does not indicate the surveillance method used by him to...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400010181036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— We appreciate Dr Duvall sharing his experience regarding the use of a 14-gauge angiocatheter in performing a thoracentesis. Although he has found this procedure relatively safe in terms of pneumothorax, he does not state the incidence of the other complications, namely, dry tap and insufficient amount, that place the patient at increased risk for morbidity because of the need for further studies. He also does not indicate the surveillance method used by him to determine the complication rate.A 14-gauge angiocatheter may be a safe method for performing a thoracentesis, but it has not been proved so in a randomized, prospective study. Our study1 demonstrated that the needle catheter technique, when used by physicians in training, is complicated by a substantial rate of pneumothorax. This method had been previously accepted at our institution as the method of choice for performing a thoracentesis. We feel that any thoracentesis References 1. Grogan DR, Irwin RS, Channick R, et al. Complications associated with thoracentesis: a prospective, randomized study comparing three different methods . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:873-877.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1991

References