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Compensatory Hypertrophy of the Ileum-Reply

Compensatory Hypertrophy of the Ileum-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply.—The rats were fed ordinary rat chow ad lib, and no attempt was made to pair-feed. Experimental animals had lost about 20% of their initial weight at the time of killing; whereas sham animals gained weight normally. The point of the experiment, however, is precisely as stated in the first paragraph of the letter from Dr Young. It may be considered well established by three laboratories working independently (references in original communication) that pancreatobiliary secretions have a trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa. Our experiment was designed to get at the question of whether or not these secretions are an absolute requirement for adaptive growth, irrespective of nutritional condition. After bypass of these secretions to the colon, there was still evidence of compensatory hypertrophy. This observation is in the opposite direction of any effect of malnutrition of which we are aware. The effect of starvation on the gut http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Compensatory Hypertrophy of the Ileum-Reply

Archives of Surgery , Volume 110 (8) – Aug 1, 1975

Compensatory Hypertrophy of the Ileum-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply.—The rats were fed ordinary rat chow ad lib, and no attempt was made to pair-feed. Experimental animals had lost about 20% of their initial weight at the time of killing; whereas sham animals gained weight normally. The point of the experiment, however, is precisely as stated in the first paragraph of the letter from Dr Young. It may be...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1975 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1975.01360140193040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply.—The rats were fed ordinary rat chow ad lib, and no attempt was made to pair-feed. Experimental animals had lost about 20% of their initial weight at the time of killing; whereas sham animals gained weight normally. The point of the experiment, however, is precisely as stated in the first paragraph of the letter from Dr Young. It may be considered well established by three laboratories working independently (references in original communication) that pancreatobiliary secretions have a trophic effect on the intestinal mucosa. Our experiment was designed to get at the question of whether or not these secretions are an absolute requirement for adaptive growth, irrespective of nutritional condition. After bypass of these secretions to the colon, there was still evidence of compensatory hypertrophy. This observation is in the opposite direction of any effect of malnutrition of which we are aware. The effect of starvation on the gut

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1975

There are no references for this article.