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Compensation of Chief Executive Officers at Nonprofit US Hospitals

Compensation of Chief Executive Officers at Nonprofit US Hospitals ImportanceHospital chief executive officers (CEOs) can shape the priorities and performance of their organizations. The degree to which their compensation is based on their hospitals’ quality performance is not well known. ObjectiveTo characterize CEO compensation and examine its relation with quality metrics. Design, Setting, and ParticipantsRetrospective observational study. Participants included 1877 CEOs at 2681 private, nonprofit US hospitals. Main Outcomes and MeasuresWe used linear regression to identify hospital structural characteristics associated with CEO pay. We then determined the degree to which a hospital’s performance on financial metrics, technologic metrics, quality metrics, and community benefit in 2008 was associated with CEO pay in 2009. ResultsThe CEOs in our sample had a mean compensation of $595 781 (median, $404 938) in 2009. In multivariate analyses, CEO pay was associated with the number of hospital beds overseen ($550 for each additional bed; 95% CI, 429-671; P < .001), teaching status ($425 078 more at major teaching vs nonteaching hospitals; 95% CI, 315 238-534 918; P < .001), and urban location. Hospitals with high levels of advanced technologic capabilities compensated their CEOs $135 862 more (95% CI, 80 744-190 990; P < .001) than did hospitals with low levels of technology. Hospitals with high performance on patient satisfaction compensated their CEOs $51 706 more than did those with low performance on patient satisfaction (95% CI, 15 166-88 247; P = .006). We found no association between CEO pay and hospitals’ margins, liquidity, capitalization, occupancy rates, process quality performance, mortality rates, readmission rates, or measures of community benefit. Conclusions and RelevanceCompensation of CEOs at nonprofit hospitals was highly variable across the country. Compensation was associated with technology and patient satisfaction but not with processes of care, patient outcomes, or community benefit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Compensation of Chief Executive Officers at Nonprofit US Hospitals

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.11537
pmid
24126743
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ImportanceHospital chief executive officers (CEOs) can shape the priorities and performance of their organizations. The degree to which their compensation is based on their hospitals’ quality performance is not well known. ObjectiveTo characterize CEO compensation and examine its relation with quality metrics. Design, Setting, and ParticipantsRetrospective observational study. Participants included 1877 CEOs at 2681 private, nonprofit US hospitals. Main Outcomes and MeasuresWe used linear regression to identify hospital structural characteristics associated with CEO pay. We then determined the degree to which a hospital’s performance on financial metrics, technologic metrics, quality metrics, and community benefit in 2008 was associated with CEO pay in 2009. ResultsThe CEOs in our sample had a mean compensation of $595 781 (median, $404 938) in 2009. In multivariate analyses, CEO pay was associated with the number of hospital beds overseen ($550 for each additional bed; 95% CI, 429-671; P < .001), teaching status ($425 078 more at major teaching vs nonteaching hospitals; 95% CI, 315 238-534 918; P < .001), and urban location. Hospitals with high levels of advanced technologic capabilities compensated their CEOs $135 862 more (95% CI, 80 744-190 990; P < .001) than did hospitals with low levels of technology. Hospitals with high performance on patient satisfaction compensated their CEOs $51 706 more than did those with low performance on patient satisfaction (95% CI, 15 166-88 247; P = .006). We found no association between CEO pay and hospitals’ margins, liquidity, capitalization, occupancy rates, process quality performance, mortality rates, readmission rates, or measures of community benefit. Conclusions and RelevanceCompensation of CEOs at nonprofit hospitals was highly variable across the country. Compensation was associated with technology and patient satisfaction but not with processes of care, patient outcomes, or community benefit.

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2014

References