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COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF DRY AND WET TEST-MEALS

COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF DRY AND WET TEST-MEALS The results regarding the secretory function of the stomach obtained by the original Ewald-Boas test-breakfast are not so conclusive as it was originally assumed, mainly on account of the closely interrelated and overlapping effect of motility and secretion. The gastric contents obtained after an Ewald-Boas test-breakfast, are made up of ingested bread and water, mucus, saliva, and gastric juice. It has been impossible to determine the proportion of gastric juice in the stomach contents. Boas suggested that a dry test-breakfast, consisting of a roll without water, would be a more accurate index of gastric secretion. Such a test would also eliminate the error due to the possible stimulating effects of water. Dry test-meals, consisting of a roll, and wet test-meals, consisting of a roll and 400 c.c. of water were given to forty-seven patients on alternate mornings, for a series of days, with a view of comparing the quantity of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF DRY AND WET TEST-MEALS

JAMA , Volume LVII (1) – Jul 1, 1911

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1911 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1911.04260070027014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The results regarding the secretory function of the stomach obtained by the original Ewald-Boas test-breakfast are not so conclusive as it was originally assumed, mainly on account of the closely interrelated and overlapping effect of motility and secretion. The gastric contents obtained after an Ewald-Boas test-breakfast, are made up of ingested bread and water, mucus, saliva, and gastric juice. It has been impossible to determine the proportion of gastric juice in the stomach contents. Boas suggested that a dry test-breakfast, consisting of a roll without water, would be a more accurate index of gastric secretion. Such a test would also eliminate the error due to the possible stimulating effects of water. Dry test-meals, consisting of a roll, and wet test-meals, consisting of a roll and 400 c.c. of water were given to forty-seven patients on alternate mornings, for a series of days, with a view of comparing the quantity of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1911

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