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Comparative Culture Methods on 101 Intravenous Catheters: Routine, Semiquantitative, and Blood Cultures

Comparative Culture Methods on 101 Intravenous Catheters: Routine, Semiquantitative, and Blood... Abstract • Broth cultures and semiquantitative cultures (SQCs) were done on 101 intravenous (IV) catheters from 82 patients. Catheters were in place an average of ten days (range, one to 40 days). Twenty-eight catheters yielded 15 colonies or more on SQCs of transcutaneous catheter segments. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most common microbial isolate found on 21 of the 28 catheters on SQC. Broth tip cultures, SQCs on tips and transcutaneous segments, qualitative blood cultures (QIBCs), and quantitative blood cultures (QnBCs) drawn via the catheters were significantly associated with peripheral bacteremia. The presence of systemic antimicrobials made no significant difference in SQC, QIBC, or QnBC positivity. With the exception of gross pus, local inflammation was not significantly associated with catheter infection. Local site care by a special team of nurses resulted in significantly fewer catheter infections than did care given by ward nurses. (Arch Intern Med 1983;143:66-69) References 1. Maki DG, Weise CE, Sarafin HW: A semiquantitative culture method for identifying intravenous catheter-related infection. N Engl J Med 1977;296:1305-1309.Crossref 2. Maki DG, Jarrett F, Sarafin HW: A semiquantitative culture method for identification of catheter-related infection in the burn patient. J Surg Res 1977;22:513-520.Crossref 3. Foley FD: The burn autopsy: Fatal complications of burns. Am J Clin Pathol 1969;52:1-13. 4. Pruitt BA, Stein JM, Foley FD, et al: Intravenous therapy in burn patients: Suppurative thrombophlebitis and other life-threatening complications. Arch Surg 1970;100:399-404.Crossref 5. Wing EF, Norden CW, Shadduck RK, et al: Use of quantitative bacteriologic techniques to diagnose catheter-related sepsis. Arch Intern Med 1979;139:482-483.Crossref 6. Moore FD, Brennan MF: Intravenous feeding. N Engl J Med 1972;287:862-864.Crossref 7. Portnoy J, Wolf PL, Webb M, et al: Candida blastospores and pseudohyphae in blood smears. N Engl J Med 1971;285:1010-1011.Crossref 8. Anderson AO, Yardley JH: Demonstration of Candida in blood smears. N Engl J Med 1972;286:108.Crossref 9. Colvin MP, Blogg CE, Savege TM, et al: A safe long-term infusion technique? Lancet 1972;2:317-320.Crossref 10. Maki DG, Goldman DA, Rahme FS: Infection control in intravenous therapy. Ann Intern Med 1973;79:867-887.Crossref 11. Cleri DJ, Corrado ML, Seligman SJ: Quantitative culture of intravenous catheters and other intravascular inserts. J Infect Dis 1980;141: 781-786.Crossref 12. Collin J, Collin C, Constable FL, et al: Infusion thrombophlebitis and infection with various cannulas. Lancet 1975;2:150-152.Crossref 13. Moran JM, Atwood RP, Rowe MI: A clinical and bacteriologic study of infections associated with venous cutdowns. N Engl J Med 1965;272:554-559.Crossref 14. Freeman R, King B: Recognition of infection associated with intravenous catheters. Br J Surg 1975;62:404-406.Crossref 15. Band JD, Maki DG: Infections caused by arterial catheters used for hemodynamic monitoring. Am J Med 1979;67:735-741.Crossref 16. Sitges-Serra A, Puig P, Jaurrieta E, et al: Catheter sepsis due to Staphylococcus epidermidis during parenteral nutrition. Surg Gynecol Obstet 1980;151:481-483. 17. Syndman DR, Murray SA, Kornfeld SJ, et al: A Prospective Evaluation of Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) Infections Using Semiquantitative Culture Methods: Eighth Annual Conference of Association for Practitioners of Infection Control . Atlanta, National Centers for Disease Control, 1981. 18. Bentley DW, Lepper MH: Septicemia related to indwelling venous catheter. JAMA 1968;206:1749-1752.Crossref 19. Corso JA, Agostinelli R, Brandriss MW: Maintenance of venous polyethylene catheters to reduce risk of infection. JAMA 1969;210:2075-2077.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Comparative Culture Methods on 101 Intravenous Catheters: Routine, Semiquantitative, and Blood Cultures

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1983.00350010070012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Broth cultures and semiquantitative cultures (SQCs) were done on 101 intravenous (IV) catheters from 82 patients. Catheters were in place an average of ten days (range, one to 40 days). Twenty-eight catheters yielded 15 colonies or more on SQCs of transcutaneous catheter segments. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most common microbial isolate found on 21 of the 28 catheters on SQC. Broth tip cultures, SQCs on tips and transcutaneous segments, qualitative blood cultures (QIBCs), and quantitative blood cultures (QnBCs) drawn via the catheters were significantly associated with peripheral bacteremia. The presence of systemic antimicrobials made no significant difference in SQC, QIBC, or QnBC positivity. With the exception of gross pus, local inflammation was not significantly associated with catheter infection. Local site care by a special team of nurses resulted in significantly fewer catheter infections than did care given by ward nurses. (Arch Intern Med 1983;143:66-69) References 1. Maki DG, Weise CE, Sarafin HW: A semiquantitative culture method for identifying intravenous catheter-related infection. N Engl J Med 1977;296:1305-1309.Crossref 2. Maki DG, Jarrett F, Sarafin HW: A semiquantitative culture method for identification of catheter-related infection in the burn patient. J Surg Res 1977;22:513-520.Crossref 3. Foley FD: The burn autopsy: Fatal complications of burns. Am J Clin Pathol 1969;52:1-13. 4. Pruitt BA, Stein JM, Foley FD, et al: Intravenous therapy in burn patients: Suppurative thrombophlebitis and other life-threatening complications. Arch Surg 1970;100:399-404.Crossref 5. Wing EF, Norden CW, Shadduck RK, et al: Use of quantitative bacteriologic techniques to diagnose catheter-related sepsis. Arch Intern Med 1979;139:482-483.Crossref 6. Moore FD, Brennan MF: Intravenous feeding. N Engl J Med 1972;287:862-864.Crossref 7. Portnoy J, Wolf PL, Webb M, et al: Candida blastospores and pseudohyphae in blood smears. N Engl J Med 1971;285:1010-1011.Crossref 8. Anderson AO, Yardley JH: Demonstration of Candida in blood smears. N Engl J Med 1972;286:108.Crossref 9. Colvin MP, Blogg CE, Savege TM, et al: A safe long-term infusion technique? Lancet 1972;2:317-320.Crossref 10. Maki DG, Goldman DA, Rahme FS: Infection control in intravenous therapy. Ann Intern Med 1973;79:867-887.Crossref 11. Cleri DJ, Corrado ML, Seligman SJ: Quantitative culture of intravenous catheters and other intravascular inserts. J Infect Dis 1980;141: 781-786.Crossref 12. Collin J, Collin C, Constable FL, et al: Infusion thrombophlebitis and infection with various cannulas. Lancet 1975;2:150-152.Crossref 13. Moran JM, Atwood RP, Rowe MI: A clinical and bacteriologic study of infections associated with venous cutdowns. N Engl J Med 1965;272:554-559.Crossref 14. Freeman R, King B: Recognition of infection associated with intravenous catheters. Br J Surg 1975;62:404-406.Crossref 15. Band JD, Maki DG: Infections caused by arterial catheters used for hemodynamic monitoring. Am J Med 1979;67:735-741.Crossref 16. Sitges-Serra A, Puig P, Jaurrieta E, et al: Catheter sepsis due to Staphylococcus epidermidis during parenteral nutrition. Surg Gynecol Obstet 1980;151:481-483. 17. Syndman DR, Murray SA, Kornfeld SJ, et al: A Prospective Evaluation of Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) Infections Using Semiquantitative Culture Methods: Eighth Annual Conference of Association for Practitioners of Infection Control . Atlanta, National Centers for Disease Control, 1981. 18. Bentley DW, Lepper MH: Septicemia related to indwelling venous catheter. JAMA 1968;206:1749-1752.Crossref 19. Corso JA, Agostinelli R, Brandriss MW: Maintenance of venous polyethylene catheters to reduce risk of infection. JAMA 1969;210:2075-2077.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1983

References