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Communicating Magnesium Content

Communicating Magnesium Content Abstract In August 1993, I was asked to review the events surrounding the intravenous administration of 224 mmol of magnesium sulfate over a 7-hour period to a 74-year-old hospital patient with asymptomatic hypomagnesemia. The ensuing respiratory arrest was accompanied by asystole soon thereafter. There was gratifying response to intubation, ventilation, external cardiac compression, administration of epinephrine and atropine, and discontinuance of the magnesium infusion. Intravenous saline administration over the subsequent 48-hour period allowed reduction in the serum magnesium concentration from 7.2 to 1.65 mmol/L (normal range, 0.7 to 1.1 mmol/L). The total dose of magnesium and the rate of infusion were very similar to those recently reported as the cause of parasympathetic and neuromuscular blockade, requiring ventilatory assistance in a 27-year-old patient.1 In that May 10, 1993, article, the normal values for serum magnesium are stated incorrectly by factors of 4 to 5 in millimoles per liter (mmol/L) (once) and References 1. Rizzo MA, Fisher M, Lock JP. Hypermagnesemic pseudocoma . Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1130-1132.Crossref 2. Matz R. Magnesium deficiencies and therapeutic uses . Hosp Pract. 1993;28: 79-92. 3. Clark BA, Brown RS. Unsuspected morbid hypermagnesemia in elderly patients . Am J Nephrol. 1992;12:336-343.Crossref 4. Campion EW. A retreat from SI units . N Engl J Med. 1992;327:49.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Communicating Magnesium Content

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 154 (8) – Apr 25, 1994

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1994.00420080132014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In August 1993, I was asked to review the events surrounding the intravenous administration of 224 mmol of magnesium sulfate over a 7-hour period to a 74-year-old hospital patient with asymptomatic hypomagnesemia. The ensuing respiratory arrest was accompanied by asystole soon thereafter. There was gratifying response to intubation, ventilation, external cardiac compression, administration of epinephrine and atropine, and discontinuance of the magnesium infusion. Intravenous saline administration over the subsequent 48-hour period allowed reduction in the serum magnesium concentration from 7.2 to 1.65 mmol/L (normal range, 0.7 to 1.1 mmol/L). The total dose of magnesium and the rate of infusion were very similar to those recently reported as the cause of parasympathetic and neuromuscular blockade, requiring ventilatory assistance in a 27-year-old patient.1 In that May 10, 1993, article, the normal values for serum magnesium are stated incorrectly by factors of 4 to 5 in millimoles per liter (mmol/L) (once) and References 1. Rizzo MA, Fisher M, Lock JP. Hypermagnesemic pseudocoma . Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1130-1132.Crossref 2. Matz R. Magnesium deficiencies and therapeutic uses . Hosp Pract. 1993;28: 79-92. 3. Clark BA, Brown RS. Unsuspected morbid hypermagnesemia in elderly patients . Am J Nephrol. 1992;12:336-343.Crossref 4. Campion EW. A retreat from SI units . N Engl J Med. 1992;327:49.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 25, 1994

References