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Commentary

Commentary Abstract The historical aspects of sickle cell anemia are well known and described in two recent texts.1,2 Even though red blood cells were seen and described by Antonj Van Leeuwenhoek in 1674, Paul Ehrlich developed stains for examining tissue and cells microscopically in 1877, and the signs and symptoms of sickle cell anemia were appreciated for years (perhaps hundreds of years) it took J. B. Herrick, in 1910, to put all this together when he described the first case of sickle cell anemia. The cause of the red blood cell abnormality continued to be a mystery until in 1948-1949, when a newly developed electrophoresis method showed that the hemoglobin of sickle cells was different from that of normal cells. (A Nobel prize was awarded for this.) Subsequently, the genetics of the disorder were clarified and the sickle hemoglobin was found to be an abnormality of the β-polypeptide chain (glutamic acid References 1. Conley CL: Sickle-cell anemia: The first molecular disease , in Wintrobe MM (ed): Blood, Pure And Eloquent . New York, McGraw-Hill International Book Co, 1980, pp 319-371. 2. Serjeant GR: Sickle Cell Disease . New York, Oxford University Press 1985. 3. Sydenstricked [sic] VP, Mulherin WA, Houseal RW: Sickle cell ane mia: Report of two cases in children, with necropsy in one case . AJDC 1923;26:132-154. 4. Emmel VE: A study of the erythrocytes in a case of severe anemia with elongated and sickle-shaped red blood corpuscles . Arch Intern Med 1917;20: 586-598.Crossref 5. Sydenstricker VP: Further studies on sickle cell anemia . JAMA 1924;83:12-15.Crossref 6. Johnson CS: Sickle cell anemia . JAMA 1985;254:1958-1963.Crossref 7. Mills ML: Life-threatening complications of sickle cell disease in children . JAMA 1985;254:1487-1491.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Commentary

Abstract

Abstract The historical aspects of sickle cell anemia are well known and described in two recent texts.1,2 Even though red blood cells were seen and described by Antonj Van Leeuwenhoek in 1674, Paul Ehrlich developed stains for examining tissue and cells microscopically in 1877, and the signs and symptoms of sickle cell anemia were appreciated for years (perhaps hundreds of years) it took J. B. Herrick, in 1910, to put all this together when he described the first case of sickle cell anemia....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460060034026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The historical aspects of sickle cell anemia are well known and described in two recent texts.1,2 Even though red blood cells were seen and described by Antonj Van Leeuwenhoek in 1674, Paul Ehrlich developed stains for examining tissue and cells microscopically in 1877, and the signs and symptoms of sickle cell anemia were appreciated for years (perhaps hundreds of years) it took J. B. Herrick, in 1910, to put all this together when he described the first case of sickle cell anemia. The cause of the red blood cell abnormality continued to be a mystery until in 1948-1949, when a newly developed electrophoresis method showed that the hemoglobin of sickle cells was different from that of normal cells. (A Nobel prize was awarded for this.) Subsequently, the genetics of the disorder were clarified and the sickle hemoglobin was found to be an abnormality of the β-polypeptide chain (glutamic acid References 1. Conley CL: Sickle-cell anemia: The first molecular disease , in Wintrobe MM (ed): Blood, Pure And Eloquent . New York, McGraw-Hill International Book Co, 1980, pp 319-371. 2. Serjeant GR: Sickle Cell Disease . New York, Oxford University Press 1985. 3. Sydenstricked [sic] VP, Mulherin WA, Houseal RW: Sickle cell ane mia: Report of two cases in children, with necropsy in one case . AJDC 1923;26:132-154. 4. Emmel VE: A study of the erythrocytes in a case of severe anemia with elongated and sickle-shaped red blood corpuscles . Arch Intern Med 1917;20: 586-598.Crossref 5. Sydenstricker VP: Further studies on sickle cell anemia . JAMA 1924;83:12-15.Crossref 6. Johnson CS: Sickle cell anemia . JAMA 1985;254:1958-1963.Crossref 7. Mills ML: Life-threatening complications of sickle cell disease in children . JAMA 1985;254:1487-1491.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1987

References

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