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Combating the Epidemic of Heart Disease

Combating the Epidemic of Heart Disease Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. In this issue of JAMA, Webber and colleagues report on Daniel Levy, MD the prevalence of coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in 3832 US service members who died from combat or uninten- T THE BEGINNING OF THE 20TH CENTURY, THE 3 tional injuries from 2001 to 2011 while serving in support leading causes of death in the United States were of military operations in Iraq or Afghanistan. With a mean infectious diseases—pneumonia, tuberculosis, and age of 27 years, the service members’ prevalence of coro- Adiarrhea—which in combination claimed 539 lives 1 nary atherosclerosis of any degree was 8.5%, a value con- per 100 000. Lurking in the background as the fourth lead- siderably lower than reported by Enos et al (77%) and ing cause of death was heart disease (137 deaths per 100 000). McNamara et al (45%). Minimal, moderate, and severe coro- But this would change. With life expectancy of only 47 years nary atherosclerosis were present in only 1.5%, 4.7%, and at the beginning of the century, people did not live long 2.3% of the recent decedents, respectively. The large http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Combating the Epidemic of Heart Disease

JAMA , Volume 308 (24) – Dec 26, 2012

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.164971
pmid
23268522
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. In this issue of JAMA, Webber and colleagues report on Daniel Levy, MD the prevalence of coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in 3832 US service members who died from combat or uninten- T THE BEGINNING OF THE 20TH CENTURY, THE 3 tional injuries from 2001 to 2011 while serving in support leading causes of death in the United States were of military operations in Iraq or Afghanistan. With a mean infectious diseases—pneumonia, tuberculosis, and age of 27 years, the service members’ prevalence of coro- Adiarrhea—which in combination claimed 539 lives 1 nary atherosclerosis of any degree was 8.5%, a value con- per 100 000. Lurking in the background as the fourth lead- siderably lower than reported by Enos et al (77%) and ing cause of death was heart disease (137 deaths per 100 000). McNamara et al (45%). Minimal, moderate, and severe coro- But this would change. With life expectancy of only 47 years nary atherosclerosis were present in only 1.5%, 4.7%, and at the beginning of the century, people did not live long 2.3% of the recent decedents, respectively. The large

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 26, 2012

References