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COINCIDENT INFECTION OF A HUMAN AND AN ANTHROPOID WITH MICROSPORUM AUDOUINI: Report of a Case

COINCIDENT INFECTION OF A HUMAN AND AN ANTHROPOID WITH MICROSPORUM AUDOUINI: Report of a Case Abstract IN JANUARY, 1950, one of us (J. P. S.) was confronted by a patient who stated that she and her pet monkey were scratching pruritic lesions which she thought were ringworm. Considering the number of times that laymen falsely accuse the animal world of conferring infection upon mankind, the piquant fact is that this patient made a correct diagnosis. REPORT OF CASE The patient was a 46-yr.-old white woman who operated a pet shop. A week after acquiring a capuchin monkey she noted on the exposed portions of her neck and forearms annular erythematous plaques with a fine branny scale, 0.5 cm. to 1.5 cm. in size. Pruritus was a prominent symptom. Crops of new lesions kept on reappearing during her period of contact with the monkey. The application of 10% salicylanilide ointment to any given lesion was followed by regression within about two weeks.The simian was a male References 1. Hazen, E. L.: Microsporum Audouini: The Effect of Yeast Extract, Thiamine, Pyridoxine and Bacillus Weidmaniensis on the Colony Characteristics and Macroconidial Formation , Mycologia 39:200-209, 1947.Crossref 2. Conant, N. F.: Studies in the Genus Microsporum: Cultural Studies , Arch. Derm. & Syph. 33:665-683 ( (April) ) 1936. 3. Hull, Thomas G.: Diseases Transmitted from Animals to Man , ed. 3, Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, 1947. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & Syphilology American Medical Association

COINCIDENT INFECTION OF A HUMAN AND AN ANTHROPOID WITH MICROSPORUM AUDOUINI: Report of a Case

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1951 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5979
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1951.01570100112017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract IN JANUARY, 1950, one of us (J. P. S.) was confronted by a patient who stated that she and her pet monkey were scratching pruritic lesions which she thought were ringworm. Considering the number of times that laymen falsely accuse the animal world of conferring infection upon mankind, the piquant fact is that this patient made a correct diagnosis. REPORT OF CASE The patient was a 46-yr.-old white woman who operated a pet shop. A week after acquiring a capuchin monkey she noted on the exposed portions of her neck and forearms annular erythematous plaques with a fine branny scale, 0.5 cm. to 1.5 cm. in size. Pruritus was a prominent symptom. Crops of new lesions kept on reappearing during her period of contact with the monkey. The application of 10% salicylanilide ointment to any given lesion was followed by regression within about two weeks.The simian was a male References 1. Hazen, E. L.: Microsporum Audouini: The Effect of Yeast Extract, Thiamine, Pyridoxine and Bacillus Weidmaniensis on the Colony Characteristics and Macroconidial Formation , Mycologia 39:200-209, 1947.Crossref 2. Conant, N. F.: Studies in the Genus Microsporum: Cultural Studies , Arch. Derm. & Syph. 33:665-683 ( (April) ) 1936. 3. Hull, Thomas G.: Diseases Transmitted from Animals to Man , ed. 3, Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, 1947.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology & SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1951

References