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Coexisting Acute Appendicitis and Bleeding Ovarian Follicle with Hemoperitoneum

Coexisting Acute Appendicitis and Bleeding Ovarian Follicle with Hemoperitoneum Abstract The simultaneous development of acute appendicitis and ruptured Graafian follicle with intraperitoneal hemorrhage is exceedingly infrequent. A review of the literature has shown that the condition has been scantily recorded, and we have been unable to find any record of a large series of cases bearing on this subject. In this country there is probably no surgeon with a personal experience of this subject large enough as yet to be of statistical value. From a clinical point of view the most interesting aspect of this condition is the diagnosis, and quite a brief acquaintance with it quickly teaches the ease with which the true nature of the disease may be missed. Our purpose in writing this paper is to record our experiences and difficulties and the results of treatments, rather than to describe all aspects of this unusual occurrence. Also, in view of the apparent rarity of the condition and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives Surgery American Medical Association

Coexisting Acute Appendicitis and Bleeding Ovarian Follicle with Hemoperitoneum

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1955 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6908
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1955.01270140026004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The simultaneous development of acute appendicitis and ruptured Graafian follicle with intraperitoneal hemorrhage is exceedingly infrequent. A review of the literature has shown that the condition has been scantily recorded, and we have been unable to find any record of a large series of cases bearing on this subject. In this country there is probably no surgeon with a personal experience of this subject large enough as yet to be of statistical value. From a clinical point of view the most interesting aspect of this condition is the diagnosis, and quite a brief acquaintance with it quickly teaches the ease with which the true nature of the disease may be missed. Our purpose in writing this paper is to record our experiences and difficulties and the results of treatments, rather than to describe all aspects of this unusual occurrence. Also, in view of the apparent rarity of the condition and

Journal

A.M.A. Archives SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1955

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