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Clues for the Early Diagnosis of Ludwig's Angina

Clues for the Early Diagnosis of Ludwig's Angina Abstract Ludwig's angina (odontogenic cellulitis) carried a mortality rate greater than 54% before the antibiotic era of medicine.1 In the past 30 years, its frequency and severity have decreased, but reports of severe complications (including death) still appear in the literature.2,3 We describe a case of Ludwig's angina in which early recognition of clues led to the diagnosis and resulted in prompt resolution, thus preventing surgical intervention and severe complications. Back to top Article Information Reprint requests to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, 2500 N State St, Jackson, MS 39216 (Dr Bates). References 1. Williams AC: Ludwig's angina. Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1940;70:140-149.Google Scholar 2. Meyers BR, Lawson W, Hirschman SZ: Ludwig's angina: Case report, with review of bacteriology and current therapy. Am J Med. 1972;53:257-260. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Barkin RM, Bonis SL, Elghammer RM, et al: Ludwig angina in children. J Pediatr. 1975;87:563-565.Google ScholarCrossref 4. Williams AC, Guralnick WC: The diagnosis and treatment of Ludwig's angina: A report of 20 cases. N Engl J Med. 1943;228:443-450. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 5. Chow AW, Roser SM, Brady FA: Orofacial odontogenic infections. Ann Intern Med. 1978;88:392-402. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 6. Holland CS: The management of Ludwig's angina. Br J Oral Surg. 1975;13:153-159.Google ScholarCrossref 7. English WF, Kaiser AB: Lethal toothache: Parapharyngeal cellulitis complicating dental infection. South Med J. 1979;72:687-689. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1982.00340180144025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Ludwig's angina (odontogenic cellulitis) carried a mortality rate greater than 54% before the antibiotic era of medicine.1 In the past 30 years, its frequency and severity have decreased, but reports of severe complications (including death) still appear in the literature.2,3 We describe a case of Ludwig's angina in which early recognition of clues led to the diagnosis and resulted in prompt resolution, thus preventing surgical intervention and severe complications. Back to top Article Information Reprint requests to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, 2500 N State St, Jackson, MS 39216 (Dr Bates). References 1. Williams AC: Ludwig's angina. Surg Gynecol Obstet. 1940;70:140-149.Google Scholar 2. Meyers BR, Lawson W, Hirschman SZ: Ludwig's angina: Case report, with review of bacteriology and current therapy. Am J Med. 1972;53:257-260. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. Barkin RM, Bonis SL, Elghammer RM, et al: Ludwig angina in children. J Pediatr. 1975;87:563-565.Google ScholarCrossref 4. Williams AC, Guralnick WC: The diagnosis and treatment of Ludwig's angina: A report of 20 cases. N Engl J Med. 1943;228:443-450. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 5. Chow AW, Roser SM, Brady FA: Orofacial odontogenic infections. Ann Intern Med. 1978;88:392-402. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 6. Holland CS: The management of Ludwig's angina. Br J Oral Surg. 1975;13:153-159.Google ScholarCrossref 7. English WF, Kaiser AB: Lethal toothache: Parapharyngeal cellulitis complicating dental infection. South Med J. 1979;72:687-689. PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1982

Keywords: ludwig's angina,surgical procedures, operative,antibiotics,cellulitis

References