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Clinical Uncertainty—Reply

Clinical Uncertainty—Reply Letters We also agree with the authors that improvements in the sary to achieving truly shared decision-making, we believe that training of clinicians and medical scientists in the recogni- health care professionals should begin by understanding and tion, practice, and study of sex- and gender-informed medi- accounting for their own and patients’ (possibly disparate) tol- cal care should become a key component of the promulga- erances for ambiguity. tion of best clinical practices. Some progress has been made Clinicians’ attitudes toward uncertainty influence their in improving curricula of medical training programs, and we views of treatment options and how they frame those options welcome continued innovation and collaboration in these when communicating with patients. That framing can affect pa- arenas. tients’ preferences. For example, an uncertainty-averse clini- In response to the letter by Peters and Woodward, we ap- cian who doubts a therapy because it is less familiar can easily— preciate their important comment about the distinctions be- and truthfully—present it in a manner that decreases its appeal, tween relative risks and absolute risks. Their points are par- perhaps by presenting it as not benefiting 70% of patients in- ticularly important when evaluating sex differences because stead of benefiting http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2020 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.1686
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters We also agree with the authors that improvements in the sary to achieving truly shared decision-making, we believe that training of clinicians and medical scientists in the recogni- health care professionals should begin by understanding and tion, practice, and study of sex- and gender-informed medi- accounting for their own and patients’ (possibly disparate) tol- cal care should become a key component of the promulga- erances for ambiguity. tion of best clinical practices. Some progress has been made Clinicians’ attitudes toward uncertainty influence their in improving curricula of medical training programs, and we views of treatment options and how they frame those options welcome continued innovation and collaboration in these when communicating with patients. That framing can affect pa- arenas. tients’ preferences. For example, an uncertainty-averse clini- In response to the letter by Peters and Woodward, we ap- cian who doubts a therapy because it is less familiar can easily— preciate their important comment about the distinctions be- and truthfully—present it in a manner that decreases its appeal, tween relative risks and absolute risks. Their points are par- perhaps by presenting it as not benefiting 70% of patients in- ticularly important when evaluating sex differences because stead of benefiting

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 15, 2020

References