Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Clinical Role Models: Importance of Attending Faculty-Reply

Clinical Role Models: Importance of Attending Faculty-Reply Abstract In Reply. — Pais addresses a very worrisome deficiency of clinical role models in the underfinanced, understaffed city hospital setting. The "rambo resident" fills in the void and sets the tone for more junior learners—a technologically focused, clinically immature, and psychosocially barren approach that neglects the patient as a person with "human" needs. The learner is basically taught to view the patient as a disease manifest by a set of laboratory results, not as a human being trying to cope with an illness.Pais' points are well taken and portray the worst case scenario of the problems that I addressed in my commentary. The take home message remains the same: patient care in general and patient-physician communication in particular will not improve until the most clinically adept and highly motivated bedside clinicians return to center stage as the role models for students and residents. Academic leaders must first acknowledge the References 1. American Medical Association. Directory of Graduate Medical Education: 1990-1991 . Chicago, Ill: American Medical Association; 1990:47-51. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Clinical Role Models: Importance of Attending Faculty-Reply

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 151 (4) – Apr 1, 1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/clinical-role-models-importance-of-attending-faculty-reply-syOzuD6djS
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1991.00400040146043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. — Pais addresses a very worrisome deficiency of clinical role models in the underfinanced, understaffed city hospital setting. The "rambo resident" fills in the void and sets the tone for more junior learners—a technologically focused, clinically immature, and psychosocially barren approach that neglects the patient as a person with "human" needs. The learner is basically taught to view the patient as a disease manifest by a set of laboratory results, not as a human being trying to cope with an illness.Pais' points are well taken and portray the worst case scenario of the problems that I addressed in my commentary. The take home message remains the same: patient care in general and patient-physician communication in particular will not improve until the most clinically adept and highly motivated bedside clinicians return to center stage as the role models for students and residents. Academic leaders must first acknowledge the References 1. American Medical Association. Directory of Graduate Medical Education: 1990-1991 . Chicago, Ill: American Medical Association; 1990:47-51.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1991

References