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Clinical Implications of Loudness Balancing

Clinical Implications of Loudness Balancing Abstract THE ABNORMAL growth in loudness of a test tone has come to hold a special and frequently stereotyped significance, applicable only to and diagnostic of certain kinds of end-organ-related hearing losses. Valid as this stereotype may be, most of the time, it is not inviolate and does not always lead the otologist to a proper diagnosis. In fact, considerable valuable diagnostic information is lost by failure to view the Alternate Binaural Loudness Balance (ABLB) test with a broader perspective than it now enjoys. Investigators and clinicians have tried to point this out many times before, including Fowler himself, but their writings seem mainly ignored in everyday application.1-3 In this paper, we join their ranks and explore some test results which we doubt can be ignored. We also offer an operational explanation. Specifically, it will be demonstrated that, it is almost a waste of time to test only for the References 1. Fowler, E.P.: The Recruitment of Loudness Phenomenon , Laryngoscope 60:680-695, 1950. 2. Harris, J.D.; Haines, H.L.; and Myers, C.K.: Loudness Perception for Pure Tones and for Speech , Arch Otolaryng 55:107-133, 1952.Crossref 3. Palva, T.: Recruitment Testing , Arch Otolaryng 66:93-98, 1957.Crossref 4. Harris, J.D.: A Brief Critical Review of Loudness Recruitment , Psychol Bull 50:190-203, 1953.Crossref 5. Wever, E.G.: Theory of Hearing , New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1949. 6. Scharf, B.: Critical Bands and the Loudness of Complex Sounds Near Threshold , J Acoust Soc Amer 31:365-370, 1959.Crossref 7. Greenwood, D.C.: Critical Bandwidth and the Frequency Coordinates of the Basilar Membrane , J Acoust Soc Amer 33:1344-1356, 1961.Crossref 8. Schuknecht, H.F.: in Neural Mechanisms of the Auditory and Vestibular Systems , Rasmussen, G.L., and Windle, W.F. (eds.), Springfield, Ill: Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1960. 9. Jerger, J.F.: Observations on Auditory Behavior in Lesions of the Central Auditory Pathways , Arch Otolaryng 71:797-806, 1960.Crossref 10. Dix, M.R.: Observations Upon the Nerve Fibre Deafness of Multiple Sclerosis, With Particular Reference to the Phenomenon of Loudness Recruitment , J Laryn 79:695-706, 1965.Crossref 11. Owens, E.: The SISI Test and VIIIth Nerve Versus Cochlear Involvement , J Speech Hearing Dis 30:252-262, 1965. 12. Jerger, J.F.; Shedd, J.L.; and Harford, E.R.: On the Detection of Extremely Small Changes in Sound Intensity , Arch Otolaryng 69:200-211, 1959.Crossref 13. Luscher, E., and Zwislocki, J.: A Simple Method for Indirect Monaural Determination of the Recruitment Phenomenon , Acta Otolaryng , (suppl 78) , http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Clinical Implications of Loudness Balancing

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1966.00760020451009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE ABNORMAL growth in loudness of a test tone has come to hold a special and frequently stereotyped significance, applicable only to and diagnostic of certain kinds of end-organ-related hearing losses. Valid as this stereotype may be, most of the time, it is not inviolate and does not always lead the otologist to a proper diagnosis. In fact, considerable valuable diagnostic information is lost by failure to view the Alternate Binaural Loudness Balance (ABLB) test with a broader perspective than it now enjoys. Investigators and clinicians have tried to point this out many times before, including Fowler himself, but their writings seem mainly ignored in everyday application.1-3 In this paper, we join their ranks and explore some test results which we doubt can be ignored. We also offer an operational explanation. Specifically, it will be demonstrated that, it is almost a waste of time to test only for the References 1. Fowler, E.P.: The Recruitment of Loudness Phenomenon , Laryngoscope 60:680-695, 1950. 2. Harris, J.D.; Haines, H.L.; and Myers, C.K.: Loudness Perception for Pure Tones and for Speech , Arch Otolaryng 55:107-133, 1952.Crossref 3. Palva, T.: Recruitment Testing , Arch Otolaryng 66:93-98, 1957.Crossref 4. Harris, J.D.: A Brief Critical Review of Loudness Recruitment , Psychol Bull 50:190-203, 1953.Crossref 5. Wever, E.G.: Theory of Hearing , New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1949. 6. Scharf, B.: Critical Bands and the Loudness of Complex Sounds Near Threshold , J Acoust Soc Amer 31:365-370, 1959.Crossref 7. Greenwood, D.C.: Critical Bandwidth and the Frequency Coordinates of the Basilar Membrane , J Acoust Soc Amer 33:1344-1356, 1961.Crossref 8. Schuknecht, H.F.: in Neural Mechanisms of the Auditory and Vestibular Systems , Rasmussen, G.L., and Windle, W.F. (eds.), Springfield, Ill: Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1960. 9. Jerger, J.F.: Observations on Auditory Behavior in Lesions of the Central Auditory Pathways , Arch Otolaryng 71:797-806, 1960.Crossref 10. Dix, M.R.: Observations Upon the Nerve Fibre Deafness of Multiple Sclerosis, With Particular Reference to the Phenomenon of Loudness Recruitment , J Laryn 79:695-706, 1965.Crossref 11. Owens, E.: The SISI Test and VIIIth Nerve Versus Cochlear Involvement , J Speech Hearing Dis 30:252-262, 1965. 12. Jerger, J.F.; Shedd, J.L.; and Harford, E.R.: On the Detection of Extremely Small Changes in Sound Intensity , Arch Otolaryng 69:200-211, 1959.Crossref 13. Luscher, E., and Zwislocki, J.: A Simple Method for Indirect Monaural Determination of the Recruitment Phenomenon , Acta Otolaryng , (suppl 78) ,

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1966

References