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Clinical Gastroenterology.

Clinical Gastroenterology. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Superbly delightful medical reading is Palmer's "Clinical Gastroenterology." Its untraditional approach to diseases of the intestine and juxtaposed organs has already incited controversy. I take a firm stand with the concepts expressed and the scholarly approach exemplified by this book. A questioning attitude, checked at the bedside and in the laboratory, commands attention for each unit. To one who is not primarily a gastroenterologist, Palmer's approach to these problems is refreshing. The general internist will find much in the book that agrees with his daily experiences on the ward and in the office. In this book, gastroenterology is pushed in the turbulent stream of modern medicine. With Palmer's help, the subspecialty swims well, heading upstream, eyes open, efficiently taking in pure air before plunging deeply. The modern outlook reflected in this book is not in documenting efforts to make gastroenterology an exact clinical science. Dull studies are not detailed here. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Clinical Gastroenterology.

A.M.A. Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 102 (2) – Aug 1, 1958

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0888-2479
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1958.00260200162018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Superbly delightful medical reading is Palmer's "Clinical Gastroenterology." Its untraditional approach to diseases of the intestine and juxtaposed organs has already incited controversy. I take a firm stand with the concepts expressed and the scholarly approach exemplified by this book. A questioning attitude, checked at the bedside and in the laboratory, commands attention for each unit. To one who is not primarily a gastroenterologist, Palmer's approach to these problems is refreshing. The general internist will find much in the book that agrees with his daily experiences on the ward and in the office. In this book, gastroenterology is pushed in the turbulent stream of modern medicine. With Palmer's help, the subspecialty swims well, heading upstream, eyes open, efficiently taking in pure air before plunging deeply. The modern outlook reflected in this book is not in documenting efforts to make gastroenterology an exact clinical science. Dull studies are not detailed here.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1958

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