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Clinical Experience: Is It Always Beneficial?

Clinical Experience: Is It Always Beneficial? Abstract Throughout one's medical education, beginning in medical school and continuing into residency, the accumulation of clinical experience is always referred to in venerable terms. The message is, the more clinical experience one has, the better a physician one will be. The resident is always reminded that regardless of how bright or how well read he or she may be, his or her skill as a physician is limited due to lack of clinical experience. Yet few of the pediatric practitioners who have accumulated many years of this valuable experience seem to command the resident's respect. The explanation for this paradox lies in the fact that in the area of therapeutics, the lack of clinical experience is better than clinical experience that has not been evaluated critically. Unfortunately, the importance of critical evaluation as a component of clinical experience is not stressed enough in either residency or postresidency education. This often References 1. Millchap JG: Febrile Convulsions . New York, Macmillan Publishing Co Inc, 1968. 2. Mackintosh MB: Studies on prophylactic treatment of febrile convulsions in children: Is it feasible to inhibit attacks by giving drugs at the first sign of fever or infection? Clin Pediatr 1970; 9:283-286.Crossref 3. Faero O, Kastrup KW, Lykkegaard Nielsen I, et al: Successful prophylaxis of febrile convulsions with phenobarbital . Epilepsia 1972;13: 279-285.Crossref 4. Pearce JL, Sharman JR, Farster MB: Phenobarbital in the acute management of febrile convulsions . Pediatrics 1977;60:569-572. 5. Ginsburg CM, Clahsen J: Evaluation of trimethobenzamide hydrochloride (Tigan) suppositories for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in children . J Pediatr 1980;96:267-269. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Clinical Experience: Is It Always Beneficial?

American Journal of Diseases of Children , Volume 141 (6) – Jun 1, 1987

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1987.04460060090042
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Throughout one's medical education, beginning in medical school and continuing into residency, the accumulation of clinical experience is always referred to in venerable terms. The message is, the more clinical experience one has, the better a physician one will be. The resident is always reminded that regardless of how bright or how well read he or she may be, his or her skill as a physician is limited due to lack of clinical experience. Yet few of the pediatric practitioners who have accumulated many years of this valuable experience seem to command the resident's respect. The explanation for this paradox lies in the fact that in the area of therapeutics, the lack of clinical experience is better than clinical experience that has not been evaluated critically. Unfortunately, the importance of critical evaluation as a component of clinical experience is not stressed enough in either residency or postresidency education. This often References 1. Millchap JG: Febrile Convulsions . New York, Macmillan Publishing Co Inc, 1968. 2. Mackintosh MB: Studies on prophylactic treatment of febrile convulsions in children: Is it feasible to inhibit attacks by giving drugs at the first sign of fever or infection? Clin Pediatr 1970; 9:283-286.Crossref 3. Faero O, Kastrup KW, Lykkegaard Nielsen I, et al: Successful prophylaxis of febrile convulsions with phenobarbital . Epilepsia 1972;13: 279-285.Crossref 4. Pearce JL, Sharman JR, Farster MB: Phenobarbital in the acute management of febrile convulsions . Pediatrics 1977;60:569-572. 5. Ginsburg CM, Clahsen J: Evaluation of trimethobenzamide hydrochloride (Tigan) suppositories for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in children . J Pediatr 1980;96:267-269.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1987

References