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Clinical Behavior of Acoustic Tumors: A Flow Cytometric Analysis

Clinical Behavior of Acoustic Tumors: A Flow Cytometric Analysis Abstract • Objective. —Recently, nonsurgical treatment of acoustic tumors has been advocated as an alternative to surgical resection. Because of the relatively short follow-up in reported series of radiation-treated acoustic tumors, the lack of growth of some tumors may merely reflect the variable biologic growth potential of these tumors and not the result of treatment. DNA flow cytometry has been used to predict biologic activity in other solid tumors. It is applied in this study to assess the variability of growth potential in a typical acoustic tumor population and to determine whether relationships exist between flow cytometric data and clinical characteristics of acoustic tumors. Design. —DNA flow cytometry techniques were used to evaluate formalin—fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue previously obtained from patients who were surgically treated for acoustic neuromas. Relationships between flow cytometry data and historical data were also statistically evaluated. Setting. —Tissue samples were from patients of a large private otologic practice. Patients. —Subjects were a convenience sample of 49 patients (26 female and 23 male) with a mean age of 59 years who had undergone surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma. None of the patients had other stigmata of neurofibromatosis or tumor recurrence. All tissue specimens were pathologically confirmed acoustic neuromas, with a range in tumor size from 1 to 6 cm. Main Outcome Measures. —The measures included DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction. Historical data included age, sex, size of tumor, presenting symptom, and symptom duration. Results. —All 49 tumors showed a diploid distribution, with S-phase values ranging from 1.07% to 20.74% (mean±SD, 6.30±4.24). The ploidy and S-phase data compare favorably with previously published data in which fresh tissue was used. There were no statistically significant relationships between S-phase value and historical data. Conclusions. —The wide range of S-phase values is consistent with a large variation in tumor growth potential and suggests caution in interpreting the results of radiation treatment of acoustic tumors when follow-up is relatively short.(Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993;119:269-271) References 1. Kwartler JA, Luxford WM, Atkins J, Shelton C. Facial nerve monitoring in acoustic tumor surgery . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991;103:814-817. 2. Lunsford CD, Flickinger J, Coffey RJ. Stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery: initial North American experience in 207 patients . Arch Neurol. 1990;47:169-175.Crossref 3. Noren G, Arndt J, Hindmush T, Hirsch A. Stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of acoustic neuromas . In: Lundsford LD, ed. Modern Stereotactic Neurosurgery . Hingham, Mass: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers; 1988:481-489. 4. Nedzelski JM, Canter RJ, Kassel EE, Rowed DW, Tator CH. Is no treatment good treatment in the management of acoustic neuromas in the elderly? Laryngoscope . 1986;96:825-829.Crossref 5. Silverstein H, McDaniel A, Norrell H, Wazen J. Conservative management of acoustic neuroma in the elderly patient . Laryngoscope . 1985;95: 766-770.Crossref 6. Wazen J, Silverstein H, Norrell H, Besse B. Preoperative and postoperative growth rates in acoustic neuromas documented with CT scanning . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1985;93:151-155. 7. Dressler LG, Bartow SA. DNA flow cytometry in solid tumors: practical aspects and clinical application . Semin Diagn Pathol. 1989;6:55-82. 8. Hoshino T. Immunohistochemical analysis of the proliferative potential of nervous system tumors . ISI Atlas Sci Immunol. 1988;1:53-57. 9. May PL, Broome JC, Lawry J, Buxton RA, Battersby RDE. The prediction of recurrence in meningiomas . J Neurosurg. 1989;71:347-351.Crossref 10. Hedley DW, Friedlander ML, Taylor IW, Rugg CA, Musgrove EA. Method for analysis of cellular DNA content of paraffin-embedded pathological material using flow cytometry . J Histochem Cytochem. 1983;31: 1333-1335.Crossref 11. Dressler LG, Seamer L, Owens MA, Clark GM, McGuire WL. Evaluation of a modeling system for S-phase estimation in breast cancer by flow cytometry . Cancer Res. 1987;47:5294-5302. 12. Russell DS, Rubenstein LJ. Pathology of Tumours of the Nervous System . 4th ed. London, England: Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd; 1977. 13. Cho KG, Hoshino T, Nagashima T, Murovic JA, Wilson CB. Prediction of tumor doubling time in recurrent meningiomas . J Neurosurg. 1986;65: 790-794.Crossref 14. Hoshino T, Prados M, Wilson C, Cho KG, Lee KS, Davis RL. Prognostic implications of the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index of human gliomas . J Neurosurg. 1989;71:335-341.Crossref 15. Wennerberg J, Mercke U. Growth potential of acoustic neuromas . Am J Otol. 1989;10:293-296. 16. Rasmussen W, Tribukait B, Thomsen J, Holm LE, Tos M. Implication of DNA characterization of human acoustic neuromas . Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) . 1984;406( (suppl) ):278-281. 17. Mork SJ, Laerum OD. Modal DNA content of human intracranial neoplasms studied by flow cytometry . J Neurosurg. 1980;53:198-204.Crossref 18. Lesser THJ, Janzer RC, Kleihues JP, Fisch U. Clinical growth rate of acoustic schwannomas: correlation with the growth fraction as defined by the monoclonal antibody Ki-67 . Skull Base Surg. 1991;1:11-15.Crossref 19. Dressler L, Ford E, Bartow SA, Seamer L, Whitlinger D, Stidley C. Quality DNA flow cytometry results can be obtained using paraffin block specimens of solid tumors . Lab Invest. 1990;62:27A. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

Clinical Behavior of Acoustic Tumors: A Flow Cytometric Analysis

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1993.01880150017002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • Objective. —Recently, nonsurgical treatment of acoustic tumors has been advocated as an alternative to surgical resection. Because of the relatively short follow-up in reported series of radiation-treated acoustic tumors, the lack of growth of some tumors may merely reflect the variable biologic growth potential of these tumors and not the result of treatment. DNA flow cytometry has been used to predict biologic activity in other solid tumors. It is applied in this study to assess the variability of growth potential in a typical acoustic tumor population and to determine whether relationships exist between flow cytometric data and clinical characteristics of acoustic tumors. Design. —DNA flow cytometry techniques were used to evaluate formalin—fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue previously obtained from patients who were surgically treated for acoustic neuromas. Relationships between flow cytometry data and historical data were also statistically evaluated. Setting. —Tissue samples were from patients of a large private otologic practice. Patients. —Subjects were a convenience sample of 49 patients (26 female and 23 male) with a mean age of 59 years who had undergone surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma. None of the patients had other stigmata of neurofibromatosis or tumor recurrence. All tissue specimens were pathologically confirmed acoustic neuromas, with a range in tumor size from 1 to 6 cm. Main Outcome Measures. —The measures included DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction. Historical data included age, sex, size of tumor, presenting symptom, and symptom duration. Results. —All 49 tumors showed a diploid distribution, with S-phase values ranging from 1.07% to 20.74% (mean±SD, 6.30±4.24). The ploidy and S-phase data compare favorably with previously published data in which fresh tissue was used. There were no statistically significant relationships between S-phase value and historical data. Conclusions. —The wide range of S-phase values is consistent with a large variation in tumor growth potential and suggests caution in interpreting the results of radiation treatment of acoustic tumors when follow-up is relatively short.(Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993;119:269-271) References 1. Kwartler JA, Luxford WM, Atkins J, Shelton C. Facial nerve monitoring in acoustic tumor surgery . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991;103:814-817. 2. Lunsford CD, Flickinger J, Coffey RJ. Stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery: initial North American experience in 207 patients . Arch Neurol. 1990;47:169-175.Crossref 3. Noren G, Arndt J, Hindmush T, Hirsch A. Stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of acoustic neuromas . In: Lundsford LD, ed. Modern Stereotactic Neurosurgery . Hingham, Mass: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers; 1988:481-489. 4. Nedzelski JM, Canter RJ, Kassel EE, Rowed DW, Tator CH. Is no treatment good treatment in the management of acoustic neuromas in the elderly? Laryngoscope . 1986;96:825-829.Crossref 5. Silverstein H, McDaniel A, Norrell H, Wazen J. Conservative management of acoustic neuroma in the elderly patient . Laryngoscope . 1985;95: 766-770.Crossref 6. Wazen J, Silverstein H, Norrell H, Besse B. Preoperative and postoperative growth rates in acoustic neuromas documented with CT scanning . Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1985;93:151-155. 7. Dressler LG, Bartow SA. DNA flow cytometry in solid tumors: practical aspects and clinical application . Semin Diagn Pathol. 1989;6:55-82. 8. Hoshino T. Immunohistochemical analysis of the proliferative potential of nervous system tumors . ISI Atlas Sci Immunol. 1988;1:53-57. 9. May PL, Broome JC, Lawry J, Buxton RA, Battersby RDE. The prediction of recurrence in meningiomas . J Neurosurg. 1989;71:347-351.Crossref 10. Hedley DW, Friedlander ML, Taylor IW, Rugg CA, Musgrove EA. Method for analysis of cellular DNA content of paraffin-embedded pathological material using flow cytometry . J Histochem Cytochem. 1983;31: 1333-1335.Crossref 11. Dressler LG, Seamer L, Owens MA, Clark GM, McGuire WL. Evaluation of a modeling system for S-phase estimation in breast cancer by flow cytometry . Cancer Res. 1987;47:5294-5302. 12. Russell DS, Rubenstein LJ. Pathology of Tumours of the Nervous System . 4th ed. London, England: Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd; 1977. 13. Cho KG, Hoshino T, Nagashima T, Murovic JA, Wilson CB. Prediction of tumor doubling time in recurrent meningiomas . J Neurosurg. 1986;65: 790-794.Crossref 14. Hoshino T, Prados M, Wilson C, Cho KG, Lee KS, Davis RL. Prognostic implications of the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index of human gliomas . J Neurosurg. 1989;71:335-341.Crossref 15. Wennerberg J, Mercke U. Growth potential of acoustic neuromas . Am J Otol. 1989;10:293-296. 16. Rasmussen W, Tribukait B, Thomsen J, Holm LE, Tos M. Implication of DNA characterization of human acoustic neuromas . Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) . 1984;406( (suppl) ):278-281. 17. Mork SJ, Laerum OD. Modal DNA content of human intracranial neoplasms studied by flow cytometry . J Neurosurg. 1980;53:198-204.Crossref 18. Lesser THJ, Janzer RC, Kleihues JP, Fisch U. Clinical growth rate of acoustic schwannomas: correlation with the growth fraction as defined by the monoclonal antibody Ki-67 . Skull Base Surg. 1991;1:11-15.Crossref 19. Dressler L, Ford E, Bartow SA, Seamer L, Whitlinger D, Stidley C. Quality DNA flow cytometry results can be obtained using paraffin block specimens of solid tumors . Lab Invest. 1990;62:27A.

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1993

References