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Classifying Stability of Misalignment in Children With Esotropia Using Simulations

Classifying Stability of Misalignment in Children With Esotropia Using Simulations CLINICAL SCIENCES Classifying Stability of Misalignment in Children With Esotropia Using Simulations B. Michele Melia, ScM; Jonathan M. Holmes, BM, BCh; Danielle L. Chandler, MSPH; Stephen P. Christiansen, MD; for the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group Objective: To determine the sensitivity and specificity alignment stability and instability prospectively based on of several classification rules for stability and instability a varying number of measurements. of angle in childhood esotropia. Results: For a series of 4 measurements, the rules that Methods: We conducted 10 000 Monte Carlo simula- optimized sensitivity and specificity were “all measure- tions of participants with no actual change in angle of ments within 5 PD” for stability and “at least 2 measure- esotropia during follow-up, where “observed” changes ments differing by 15 PD or more” for instability. For a in ocular alignment were sampled from a distribution of series of 3 measurements, all 3 measurements needed to measurement errors for the prism and alternate cover test. be identical to confirm stability. Additional simulations were conducted for a range of “true” changes (1.0, 2.5, 4.2, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 prism di- Conclusions: We derived definitions of stability and in- opters [PD] per visit) with up to 10 follow-up http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Classifying Stability of Misalignment in Children With Esotropia Using Simulations

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6165
eISSN
2168-6173
DOI
10.1001/archophthalmol.2010.293
pmid
21149779
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CLINICAL SCIENCES Classifying Stability of Misalignment in Children With Esotropia Using Simulations B. Michele Melia, ScM; Jonathan M. Holmes, BM, BCh; Danielle L. Chandler, MSPH; Stephen P. Christiansen, MD; for the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group Objective: To determine the sensitivity and specificity alignment stability and instability prospectively based on of several classification rules for stability and instability a varying number of measurements. of angle in childhood esotropia. Results: For a series of 4 measurements, the rules that Methods: We conducted 10 000 Monte Carlo simula- optimized sensitivity and specificity were “all measure- tions of participants with no actual change in angle of ments within 5 PD” for stability and “at least 2 measure- esotropia during follow-up, where “observed” changes ments differing by 15 PD or more” for instability. For a in ocular alignment were sampled from a distribution of series of 3 measurements, all 3 measurements needed to measurement errors for the prism and alternate cover test. be identical to confirm stability. Additional simulations were conducted for a range of “true” changes (1.0, 2.5, 4.2, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 prism di- Conclusions: We derived definitions of stability and in- opters [PD] per visit) with up to 10 follow-up

Journal

JAMA OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 2010

References