Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CLASSIFICATION OF ANEMIA IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

CLASSIFICATION OF ANEMIA IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN A complete classification of anemia as it is encountered in all age groups must include morphologic, etiologic and clinical considerations. For the purposes of a symposium such as is being conducted today it seems important to simplify the subject as far as possible so that the discussion may be of value to the practicing physician. For this reason a classification is presented in which the causes of anemia are arranged in the order of their occurrence in a group of hospital patients. This grouping is slightly different from the order in which Dr. Zuelzer has discussed the "Pathogenesis of Anemia." Although it is incomplete, almost all cases of anemia may be placed in one of its categories. Analysis of 1,500 consecutive admissions to the Boston Floating Hospital was made to determine the incidence of anemia in hospital practice. It was found that 514 patients, or 34 per cent, showed a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

CLASSIFICATION OF ANEMIA IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

JAMA , Volume 134 (12) – Jul 19, 1947

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/classification-of-anemia-in-infants-and-children-jXRa9ogyVK
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1947 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1947.02880290016004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A complete classification of anemia as it is encountered in all age groups must include morphologic, etiologic and clinical considerations. For the purposes of a symposium such as is being conducted today it seems important to simplify the subject as far as possible so that the discussion may be of value to the practicing physician. For this reason a classification is presented in which the causes of anemia are arranged in the order of their occurrence in a group of hospital patients. This grouping is slightly different from the order in which Dr. Zuelzer has discussed the "Pathogenesis of Anemia." Although it is incomplete, almost all cases of anemia may be placed in one of its categories. Analysis of 1,500 consecutive admissions to the Boston Floating Hospital was made to determine the incidence of anemia in hospital practice. It was found that 514 patients, or 34 per cent, showed a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 19, 1947

There are no references for this article.