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CLASSIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA IN CHILDHOOD

CLASSIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA IN CHILDHOOD It was deemed worth while to publish a report of the first one hundred cases seen in the Children's Asthma Class at Bellevue Hospital on account of the unusually high percentage of positive reactions to animal emanations. The report also emphasizes the necessity of separating true asthma from chronic pulmonary infections in children. The consideration of asthma and allied conditions has been reviewed so often and so thoroughly of late that no attempt will be made to summarize the literature on the subject. Diagnosis. —The classification of the cases into either sensitive or nonsensitive was not usually made until the patients had been under observation for some time. The patients were given the telephone number of one of the attending physicians and urged to call him at the onset of an attack. Whenever possible, a visit was made at once and, though this was not practical in every case, an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

CLASSIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA IN CHILDHOOD

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1922 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1922.04120110082010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It was deemed worth while to publish a report of the first one hundred cases seen in the Children's Asthma Class at Bellevue Hospital on account of the unusually high percentage of positive reactions to animal emanations. The report also emphasizes the necessity of separating true asthma from chronic pulmonary infections in children. The consideration of asthma and allied conditions has been reviewed so often and so thoroughly of late that no attempt will be made to summarize the literature on the subject. Diagnosis. —The classification of the cases into either sensitive or nonsensitive was not usually made until the patients had been under observation for some time. The patients were given the telephone number of one of the attending physicians and urged to call him at the onset of an attack. Whenever possible, a visit was made at once and, though this was not practical in every case, an

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1922

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