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Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as a Major Contributing Factor in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as a Major Contributing Factor in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Abstract Sir.—Many causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been proposed but no one cause or combination of causes has been established.1 A current hypothesis is that SIDS may be the result of a breakdown in the integration of the complex regulatory systems to maintain life.2 One stress factor that has not been investigated adequately is exposure to carbon monoxide and its subsequent effects on respiratory control in infants. Carbon monoxide is one of the by-products of the incomplete combustion of organic materials that most commonly originates from cigarette smoke, inadequately vented heating systems, and automobile exhaust. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin with an affinity 250 times greater than that of oxygen.3 Some of the pathologic abnormalities of SIDS and carbon monoxide poisoning are similar to and consistent with chronic hypoxia.3,4 A high association of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy and after delivery has References 1. Beckwith JB: The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome . US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare publication (HSA) 78:5251, 1978. 2. Current Research in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Fact Sheet . Washington, DC, National Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Clearing-house, (September) 1984. 3. Zimmerman SS, Truxal B: Carbon monoxide poisoning . Pediatrics 1981;68:215-224. 4. Naeye RL, Ladis B, Drage JS: Sudden infant death syndrome . AJDC 1976;130:1207-1210. 5. Steele R, Kraus AS, Langworth JT: Sudden unexpected death in infancy in Ontario . Can J Public Health 1967;58:359-364. 6. Bergman AB, Wiesner LA: Relationship of passive cigarette smoking to sudden infant death syndrome . Pediatrics 1976;58:665-668. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as a Major Contributing Factor in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Chronic Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as a Major Contributing Factor in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Many causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been proposed but no one cause or combination of causes has been established.1 A current hypothesis is that SIDS may be the result of a breakdown in the integration of the complex regulatory systems to maintain life.2 One stress factor that has not been investigated adequately is exposure to carbon monoxide and its subsequent effects on respiratory control in infants. Carbon monoxide is one of the by-products of the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1986 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1986.02140210017010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—Many causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have been proposed but no one cause or combination of causes has been established.1 A current hypothesis is that SIDS may be the result of a breakdown in the integration of the complex regulatory systems to maintain life.2 One stress factor that has not been investigated adequately is exposure to carbon monoxide and its subsequent effects on respiratory control in infants. Carbon monoxide is one of the by-products of the incomplete combustion of organic materials that most commonly originates from cigarette smoke, inadequately vented heating systems, and automobile exhaust. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin with an affinity 250 times greater than that of oxygen.3 Some of the pathologic abnormalities of SIDS and carbon monoxide poisoning are similar to and consistent with chronic hypoxia.3,4 A high association of mothers who smoke cigarettes during pregnancy and after delivery has References 1. Beckwith JB: The Sudden Infant Death Syndrome . US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare publication (HSA) 78:5251, 1978. 2. Current Research in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Fact Sheet . Washington, DC, National Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Clearing-house, (September) 1984. 3. Zimmerman SS, Truxal B: Carbon monoxide poisoning . Pediatrics 1981;68:215-224. 4. Naeye RL, Ladis B, Drage JS: Sudden infant death syndrome . AJDC 1976;130:1207-1210. 5. Steele R, Kraus AS, Langworth JT: Sudden unexpected death in infancy in Ontario . Can J Public Health 1967;58:359-364. 6. Bergman AB, Wiesner LA: Relationship of passive cigarette smoking to sudden infant death syndrome . Pediatrics 1976;58:665-668.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1986

References