Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

CHRONIC BRIGHT'S DISEASE (ARTERIO-CAPILXARY FIBROSIS) IN ITS RELATIONS TO INSANITY.

CHRONIC BRIGHT'S DISEASE (ARTERIO-CAPILXARY FIBROSIS) IN ITS RELATIONS TO INSANITY. Efforts to frame a satisfactory etiological classification of mental disease have been materially helped by a resort to a clinical grouping of cases. It has been recognized that where a wide variation exists in the causes assigned for the production of insanity in any given series of cases, among certain of them "groups of symptoms" are manifested which point to a definite constantly acting cause. "In many instances we know absolutely that such a cause exists. Even if we do not know that a specific cause is antecedent to the development of a certain form of disease, we are justified in inferring, where symptoms are identical, an identity of cause." Acting upon this theory, it has been possible to frame a rational classification or "clinical grouping" that has simplified much that has hitherto been unsatisfactory and obscure. In spite, however, of the material assistance thus afforded, the lack of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

CHRONIC BRIGHT'S DISEASE (ARTERIO-CAPILXARY FIBROSIS) IN ITS RELATIONS TO INSANITY.

JAMA , Volume XII (12) – Mar 23, 1889

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/chronic-bright-s-disease-arterio-capilxary-fibrosis-in-its-relations-Wm07isLVs0
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1889 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1889.02400890001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Efforts to frame a satisfactory etiological classification of mental disease have been materially helped by a resort to a clinical grouping of cases. It has been recognized that where a wide variation exists in the causes assigned for the production of insanity in any given series of cases, among certain of them "groups of symptoms" are manifested which point to a definite constantly acting cause. "In many instances we know absolutely that such a cause exists. Even if we do not know that a specific cause is antecedent to the development of a certain form of disease, we are justified in inferring, where symptoms are identical, an identity of cause." Acting upon this theory, it has been possible to frame a rational classification or "clinical grouping" that has simplified much that has hitherto been unsatisfactory and obscure. In spite, however, of the material assistance thus afforded, the lack of a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 23, 1889

There are no references for this article.