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Choosing a Screening Method for Cervical Cancer

Choosing a Screening Method for Cervical Cancer Opinion VIEWPOINT Papanicolaou Testing Alone or With Human Papillomavirus Testing Screening for cervical cancer with the Papanicolaou tional resources, and the economic and societal effects Karen Smith-McCune, MD, PhD (Pap) test has been remarkably successful at reducing ofseekingtofurtherreducetheincidenceofcervicalcan- Department of themorbidityandmortalityratesassociatedwiththisdis- cer have not been rigorously studied. Obstetrics, Gynecology ease. The discovery that human papillomavirus (HPV) Although screening with the Pap test has led to un- and Reproductive has an essential role in cervical carcinogenesis led to the certainty regarding the clinical management of mild cer- Sciences, University of California, San development of molecular tests to measure the pres- vical abnormalities (eg, atypia and low-grade abnormali- Francisco. ence of HPV types associated with cancer. In 2012, ties), cotesting has led to a new type of ambiguity: a screening guidelines were updated to incorporate HPV normalPaptestresultwithapositiveHPVtestresult.This 1,2 testing. According to these guidelines, women 21 to outcome occurs in 3% to 8% of women screened with 29 years old should undergo screening with a Pap test cotesting and is as high as 11% in US women 30 to 34 Viewpoint page 1029 every 3 years; HPV testing is not recommended owing years old. The ACS/ASCCP/ASCP guidelines acknowl- to the high prevalence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Choosing a Screening Method for Cervical Cancer

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 174 (7) – Jul 1, 2014

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1368
pmid
24796546
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion VIEWPOINT Papanicolaou Testing Alone or With Human Papillomavirus Testing Screening for cervical cancer with the Papanicolaou tional resources, and the economic and societal effects Karen Smith-McCune, MD, PhD (Pap) test has been remarkably successful at reducing ofseekingtofurtherreducetheincidenceofcervicalcan- Department of themorbidityandmortalityratesassociatedwiththisdis- cer have not been rigorously studied. Obstetrics, Gynecology ease. The discovery that human papillomavirus (HPV) Although screening with the Pap test has led to un- and Reproductive has an essential role in cervical carcinogenesis led to the certainty regarding the clinical management of mild cer- Sciences, University of California, San development of molecular tests to measure the pres- vical abnormalities (eg, atypia and low-grade abnormali- Francisco. ence of HPV types associated with cancer. In 2012, ties), cotesting has led to a new type of ambiguity: a screening guidelines were updated to incorporate HPV normalPaptestresultwithapositiveHPVtestresult.This 1,2 testing. According to these guidelines, women 21 to outcome occurs in 3% to 8% of women screened with 29 years old should undergo screening with a Pap test cotesting and is as high as 11% in US women 30 to 34 Viewpoint page 1029 every 3 years; HPV testing is not recommended owing years old. The ACS/ASCCP/ASCP guidelines acknowl- to the high prevalence

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 2014

References