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Cholesterol Testing in the Physician's Office: Accuracy Assessment

Cholesterol Testing in the Physician's Office: Accuracy Assessment Abstract Sir.—To assess the quality of cholesterol testing performed outside hospital laboratories and reference clinical laboratories, we evaluated the accuracy of cholesterol measurement in 33 pediatricians' offices in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. The participating pediatricians responded to a survey we conducted locally to determine the number of pediatricians performing cholesterol testing. Seventy-one of the 116 responding pediatricians performed cholesterol testing routinely in their practices. Sixty-five percent of those pediatricians participated in this study. Materials and Methods.—Four frozen specimens, duplicate sets of two samples with cholesterol concentrations of 4.46 and 6.55 mmol/L, were sent to every participating pediatrician. The cholesterol concentrations of the samples were unknown to the pediatricians. The cholesterol concentrations of these sets were determined using an analyzer (Kodak Ektachem 700, Eastman Kodak Co, Rochester, NY) certified by the Centers for Disease Control—Reference Method Laboratory Network for cholesterol testing. Physicians were asked to thaw and twice analyze References 1. Kuchmak M, Taylor L, Olansky AS. Suitability of frozen and lyophilized reference sera for cholesterol and triglyceride determinations . Clin Chim Acta. 1982;120:261-271.Crossref 2. Laboratory Standardization Panel. Current status of blood cholesterol measurement in clinical laboratories in the United States: a report from the Laboratory Standardization Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program . Clin Chem. 1988;34:193-201. 3. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition. Indications for cholesterol testing in children . Pediatrics . 1989;83:141-142. 4. Laboratory Standardization Panel. Recommendations for Improving Cholesterol Measurement: A Report From the Laboratory Standardization Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program . Bethesda, Md: National Institutes of Health; 1990. NIH publication 90-2964. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Cholesterol Testing in the Physician's Office: Accuracy Assessment

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160100019009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Sir.—To assess the quality of cholesterol testing performed outside hospital laboratories and reference clinical laboratories, we evaluated the accuracy of cholesterol measurement in 33 pediatricians' offices in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. The participating pediatricians responded to a survey we conducted locally to determine the number of pediatricians performing cholesterol testing. Seventy-one of the 116 responding pediatricians performed cholesterol testing routinely in their practices. Sixty-five percent of those pediatricians participated in this study. Materials and Methods.—Four frozen specimens, duplicate sets of two samples with cholesterol concentrations of 4.46 and 6.55 mmol/L, were sent to every participating pediatrician. The cholesterol concentrations of the samples were unknown to the pediatricians. The cholesterol concentrations of these sets were determined using an analyzer (Kodak Ektachem 700, Eastman Kodak Co, Rochester, NY) certified by the Centers for Disease Control—Reference Method Laboratory Network for cholesterol testing. Physicians were asked to thaw and twice analyze References 1. Kuchmak M, Taylor L, Olansky AS. Suitability of frozen and lyophilized reference sera for cholesterol and triglyceride determinations . Clin Chim Acta. 1982;120:261-271.Crossref 2. Laboratory Standardization Panel. Current status of blood cholesterol measurement in clinical laboratories in the United States: a report from the Laboratory Standardization Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program . Clin Chem. 1988;34:193-201. 3. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition. Indications for cholesterol testing in children . Pediatrics . 1989;83:141-142. 4. Laboratory Standardization Panel. Recommendations for Improving Cholesterol Measurement: A Report From the Laboratory Standardization Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program . Bethesda, Md: National Institutes of Health; 1990. NIH publication 90-2964.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1991

References