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Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides THE PHYSICIAN, faced with an actual or potential case of intoxication from excessive absorption of an insecticide, may require guidance in the diagnosis and treatment of this relatively uncommon but potentially fatal condition. This brief note is intended only as such a guide to the management of poisoning arising from exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides; more detailed discussions of the subject are available from a number of sources.1-5 The most commonly used chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides are listed in the Table. All of these materials may be absorbed through ingestion and inhalation, most of them can be absorbed percutaneously when they are in solution, and with at least one, dieldrin, absorption through the intact skin can occur from contact with the dry form. Diagnosis In all cases in which this type of intoxication is suspected, every effort should be made to obtain the label from the original container of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Insecticides

JAMA , Volume 190 (7) – Nov 16, 1964

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1964.03070200031007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE PHYSICIAN, faced with an actual or potential case of intoxication from excessive absorption of an insecticide, may require guidance in the diagnosis and treatment of this relatively uncommon but potentially fatal condition. This brief note is intended only as such a guide to the management of poisoning arising from exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides; more detailed discussions of the subject are available from a number of sources.1-5 The most commonly used chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides are listed in the Table. All of these materials may be absorbed through ingestion and inhalation, most of them can be absorbed percutaneously when they are in solution, and with at least one, dieldrin, absorption through the intact skin can occur from contact with the dry form. Diagnosis In all cases in which this type of intoxication is suspected, every effort should be made to obtain the label from the original container of the

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 16, 1964

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