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Children and Lead

Children and Lead Abstract To the Editor.—I read with considerable interest the article by Dr. Barltrop in the February issue of the Journal (127:165, 1974). The article appears to be an excellent evaluation of current thinking about environmental sources of lead. However, the author states that the very diversity of the studies in progress has a negative aspect in that it tends to divert attention from the continuing problems of lead-based paint in the home. Lead paint remains the major lead hazard for children and is virtually the only source of lead associated with symptomatic poisoning. Some very recently available evidence suggests that other sources of lead besides paint chips may contribute significantly to the daily ingestion of the 1,000μg of lead that Barltrop indicates is sufficient to cause symptomatic lead poisoning if ingestion continues for several months. Colored printed matter (especially reds, yellows, oranges, and greens) has recently been shown to contain References 1. Joselow MM, Bogden JD: Lead content of printed media . Am J Public Health 64:238-240, 1974.Crossref 2. Browder AA, Joselow MM, Louria DB: The problem of lead poisoning . Medicine 52:121-139, 1973.Crossref 3. Lourie RS: Pica and poisoning . Am J Orthopsychiatry 41:697-699, 1971. 4. Caprio RJ, Margulis HL, Joselow MM: Lead absorption in children and its relationship to urban traffic densities . Arch Environ Health 28:195-197, 1974.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Children and Lead

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—I read with considerable interest the article by Dr. Barltrop in the February issue of the Journal (127:165, 1974). The article appears to be an excellent evaluation of current thinking about environmental sources of lead. However, the author states that the very diversity of the studies in progress has a negative aspect in that it tends to divert attention from the continuing problems of lead-based paint in the home. Lead paint remains the major lead hazard for...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1974.02110280155031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—I read with considerable interest the article by Dr. Barltrop in the February issue of the Journal (127:165, 1974). The article appears to be an excellent evaluation of current thinking about environmental sources of lead. However, the author states that the very diversity of the studies in progress has a negative aspect in that it tends to divert attention from the continuing problems of lead-based paint in the home. Lead paint remains the major lead hazard for children and is virtually the only source of lead associated with symptomatic poisoning. Some very recently available evidence suggests that other sources of lead besides paint chips may contribute significantly to the daily ingestion of the 1,000μg of lead that Barltrop indicates is sufficient to cause symptomatic lead poisoning if ingestion continues for several months. Colored printed matter (especially reds, yellows, oranges, and greens) has recently been shown to contain References 1. Joselow MM, Bogden JD: Lead content of printed media . Am J Public Health 64:238-240, 1974.Crossref 2. Browder AA, Joselow MM, Louria DB: The problem of lead poisoning . Medicine 52:121-139, 1973.Crossref 3. Lourie RS: Pica and poisoning . Am J Orthopsychiatry 41:697-699, 1971. 4. Caprio RJ, Margulis HL, Joselow MM: Lead absorption in children and its relationship to urban traffic densities . Arch Environ Health 28:195-197, 1974.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1974

References