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Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development

Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development In Oberni, France, in 1997, clinicians and scientists convened to discuss the mechanism and treatment of epilepsy in the developing brain. The result of their exhaustive deliberations is Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development. Seizures and epilepsy are common problems in infancy and childhood, and despite tremendous advances in this area, several questions remain unanswered. These questions were formulated at the onset of the conference in Oberni, and both clinicians and scientists joined together to find new avenues for research and a plan to improve care for children with epilepsy. The participants addressed the following questions concerning epilepsy: Why is the immature brain more susceptible to seizures than the mature brain? Are there developmental windows of altered seizure susceptibility? Are the consequences of seizure age specific? Do provoked seizures lead to the development of epilepsy? What are the consequences of chronic treatment on the developing brain? What is the role of heredity in the development of seizures and epilepsy? What is the role of brain injury early in life in the development of seizures and epilepsy? What is the combined effect of genetic predisposition, abnormal brain development, and subsequent injuries on the development of epilepsy? Can models of epilepsy be developed to study infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Why do both syndromes occur during discrete periods of development, and what are the structures involved to account for the unique behavioral and electrographic features? The book is divided into 7 parts, and each part consists of several chapters with the last chapter of the book devoted to concluding remarks and future plans by Dr Moshé. Each part deals with a unique issue of seizures and epilepsy in the developing brain, and chapters consist of both scientific and clinical articles focusing on questions specifically answered by authors in their respective fields. For the clinician interested in infantile and childhood epilepsies, chapters on age-specific syndromes, including infantile spasms, Lennox-Gestaut syndrome, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, and related disorders, might be of particular interest. The considerable advances that have been made during the last decade toward a better understanding of epileptic seizures are reflected in several articles, eg, the effect of hormones on the epileptic process and the importance of homeobox genes in the development of some of the brain abnormalities seen in patients with seizure disorders that are associated with dysplastic brains and migration defects. Hence, there is a need to develop a variety of models reminiscent of human dysplastic lesions that are also epileptogenic. What are the effects of seizures on the developing brain? We know that some seizures in human infants lead to acute and devastating consequences, including the destruction of many areas in the cortex. Recently developed models used in clinical situations may provide some important insight as to how the damage occurs. The issue of new treatment was also raised. Not only should it stop an ongoing seizure, but it should also be safe for the developing brain. Overall, the book brings to the reader exciting news in the field of developmental epilepsies, but it also points out the limitations of the techniques currently available that are used to study this particular field. This book is for those who have a special interest in infantile and early childhood seizures and epilepsy. It is for a neuroscientist or clinician in the field of epilepsy. Pediatricians, pediatric neurologists, and developmental pediatricians will find exciting information on epileptic syndromes, neuronal migration disorders, and cognitive and behavioral consequences of epilepsies in childhood. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine American Medical Association

Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine , Volume 154 (8) – Aug 1, 2000

Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development

Abstract

In Oberni, France, in 1997, clinicians and scientists convened to discuss the mechanism and treatment of epilepsy in the developing brain. The result of their exhaustive deliberations is Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development. Seizures and epilepsy are common problems in infancy and childhood, and despite tremendous advances in this area, several questions remain unanswered. These questions were formulated at the onset of the conference in Oberni, and both clinicians and scientists joined...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
1072-4710
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.154.8.854
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In Oberni, France, in 1997, clinicians and scientists convened to discuss the mechanism and treatment of epilepsy in the developing brain. The result of their exhaustive deliberations is Childhood Epilepsies and Brain Development. Seizures and epilepsy are common problems in infancy and childhood, and despite tremendous advances in this area, several questions remain unanswered. These questions were formulated at the onset of the conference in Oberni, and both clinicians and scientists joined together to find new avenues for research and a plan to improve care for children with epilepsy. The participants addressed the following questions concerning epilepsy: Why is the immature brain more susceptible to seizures than the mature brain? Are there developmental windows of altered seizure susceptibility? Are the consequences of seizure age specific? Do provoked seizures lead to the development of epilepsy? What are the consequences of chronic treatment on the developing brain? What is the role of heredity in the development of seizures and epilepsy? What is the role of brain injury early in life in the development of seizures and epilepsy? What is the combined effect of genetic predisposition, abnormal brain development, and subsequent injuries on the development of epilepsy? Can models of epilepsy be developed to study infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Why do both syndromes occur during discrete periods of development, and what are the structures involved to account for the unique behavioral and electrographic features? The book is divided into 7 parts, and each part consists of several chapters with the last chapter of the book devoted to concluding remarks and future plans by Dr Moshé. Each part deals with a unique issue of seizures and epilepsy in the developing brain, and chapters consist of both scientific and clinical articles focusing on questions specifically answered by authors in their respective fields. For the clinician interested in infantile and childhood epilepsies, chapters on age-specific syndromes, including infantile spasms, Lennox-Gestaut syndrome, Landau-Kleffner syndrome, and related disorders, might be of particular interest. The considerable advances that have been made during the last decade toward a better understanding of epileptic seizures are reflected in several articles, eg, the effect of hormones on the epileptic process and the importance of homeobox genes in the development of some of the brain abnormalities seen in patients with seizure disorders that are associated with dysplastic brains and migration defects. Hence, there is a need to develop a variety of models reminiscent of human dysplastic lesions that are also epileptogenic. What are the effects of seizures on the developing brain? We know that some seizures in human infants lead to acute and devastating consequences, including the destruction of many areas in the cortex. Recently developed models used in clinical situations may provide some important insight as to how the damage occurs. The issue of new treatment was also raised. Not only should it stop an ongoing seizure, but it should also be safe for the developing brain. Overall, the book brings to the reader exciting news in the field of developmental epilepsies, but it also points out the limitations of the techniques currently available that are used to study this particular field. This book is for those who have a special interest in infantile and early childhood seizures and epilepsy. It is for a neuroscientist or clinician in the field of epilepsy. Pediatricians, pediatric neurologists, and developmental pediatricians will find exciting information on epileptic syndromes, neuronal migration disorders, and cognitive and behavioral consequences of epilepsies in childhood.

Journal

Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 2000

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