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CHEMICAL ACTION OF SODIUM CITRATE AS A CAUSE OF CERTAIN TRANSFUSION REACTIONS

CHEMICAL ACTION OF SODIUM CITRATE AS A CAUSE OF CERTAIN TRANSFUSION REACTIONS During the past few years we have gained the impression that occasionally an acutely ill infant is made definitely worse rather than better by a transfusion of citrated blood. Most of these unfavorable results were observed in infants with acute gastro-intestinal disturbances. With one exception, which will be described in more detail, the effects of transfusion could hardly be described as a "transfusion reaction." There were no symptoms similar to those following the injection of incompatible blood, nor was there any suggestion of an allergic reaction, but rather an augmentation of the general unfavorable condition. Citrated transfusions were employed only after careful cross-matching of the donor's and the recipient's serum and cells. Rematching of blood in the cases giving unfavorable results failed to show any indication of incompatibility. The one instance of a fatality immediately following transfusion convinced us that the transfusion was to blame, and led to the present http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

CHEMICAL ACTION OF SODIUM CITRATE AS A CAUSE OF CERTAIN TRANSFUSION REACTIONS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1933 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1933.01950140042004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

During the past few years we have gained the impression that occasionally an acutely ill infant is made definitely worse rather than better by a transfusion of citrated blood. Most of these unfavorable results were observed in infants with acute gastro-intestinal disturbances. With one exception, which will be described in more detail, the effects of transfusion could hardly be described as a "transfusion reaction." There were no symptoms similar to those following the injection of incompatible blood, nor was there any suggestion of an allergic reaction, but rather an augmentation of the general unfavorable condition. Citrated transfusions were employed only after careful cross-matching of the donor's and the recipient's serum and cells. Rematching of blood in the cases giving unfavorable results failed to show any indication of incompatibility. The one instance of a fatality immediately following transfusion convinced us that the transfusion was to blame, and led to the present

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1933

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