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Chelation of Stapes Footplate

Chelation of Stapes Footplate Abstract A chelating agent is a chemical compound capable of forming a very stable complex with a multivalent positive ion, such as calcium. In this process of chelation a specific type of coordinate bonding occurs in some of the atoms forming the ring, and the calcium becomes such an integral part of the complex that it loses its ionic properties. It cannot be precipitated by generally used precipitating agents.1 Edathamil (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]) and its salts have been the most investigated and commonly used chelating agents. Figure 1A shows the acid to be tetrabasic with four replaceable hydrogen atoms, so that it is theoretically possible to form four different sodium salts, all of which are chelating agents. Figure 1B shows the disodium salt of edathamil and 1C shows the calcium-disodium salt, which is the end-product of the chelation of the calcium ion. In this study, the disodium salt of edathamil References 1. Spencer, H.; Vankinscott, V.; Lewin, I., and Laszlo, D.: Removal of Calcium in Man by Ethylenediamine Tetraacetic Acid: A Metabolic Study , J. Clin. Invest. 31:1023-1027 ( (Dec.) ) 1952.Crossref 2. Chenoweth, M. B.: Chelation as a Mechanism of Pharmacological Action , Pharmacol. Rev. 8:57-87 ( (March) ) 1956. 3. Grant, W. M.: New Treatment for Calcific Corneal Opacities , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 48:681-685 ( (Dec.) ) 1952.Crossref 4. Gehres, R. F., and Raymond, S.: A New Chemical Approach to the Dissolution of Urinary Calculi , J. Urol. 65:474-83 ( (March) ) 1951. 5. Clarke, N. E.; Clarke, C. N., and Mosher, R. E.: The "in Vivo" Dissolution of Metastatic Calcium: An Approach to Atherosclerosis , Am. J. M. Sc. 229:142-149 ( (Feb.) ) 1955.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Chelation of Stapes Footplate

A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 69 (1) – Jan 1, 1959

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1959.00730030005001
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract A chelating agent is a chemical compound capable of forming a very stable complex with a multivalent positive ion, such as calcium. In this process of chelation a specific type of coordinate bonding occurs in some of the atoms forming the ring, and the calcium becomes such an integral part of the complex that it loses its ionic properties. It cannot be precipitated by generally used precipitating agents.1 Edathamil (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]) and its salts have been the most investigated and commonly used chelating agents. Figure 1A shows the acid to be tetrabasic with four replaceable hydrogen atoms, so that it is theoretically possible to form four different sodium salts, all of which are chelating agents. Figure 1B shows the disodium salt of edathamil and 1C shows the calcium-disodium salt, which is the end-product of the chelation of the calcium ion. In this study, the disodium salt of edathamil References 1. Spencer, H.; Vankinscott, V.; Lewin, I., and Laszlo, D.: Removal of Calcium in Man by Ethylenediamine Tetraacetic Acid: A Metabolic Study , J. Clin. Invest. 31:1023-1027 ( (Dec.) ) 1952.Crossref 2. Chenoweth, M. B.: Chelation as a Mechanism of Pharmacological Action , Pharmacol. Rev. 8:57-87 ( (March) ) 1956. 3. Grant, W. M.: New Treatment for Calcific Corneal Opacities , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 48:681-685 ( (Dec.) ) 1952.Crossref 4. Gehres, R. F., and Raymond, S.: A New Chemical Approach to the Dissolution of Urinary Calculi , J. Urol. 65:474-83 ( (March) ) 1951. 5. Clarke, N. E.; Clarke, C. N., and Mosher, R. E.: The "in Vivo" Dissolution of Metastatic Calcium: An Approach to Atherosclerosis , Am. J. M. Sc. 229:142-149 ( (Feb.) ) 1955.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1959

References