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Cervical Spondylosis: Its Early Diagnosis and Treatment.

Cervical Spondylosis: Its Early Diagnosis and Treatment. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Cervical spondylosis is frequently a pain in the neck for the physician as well as the patient. It is comforting for both parties to learn (in the concluding chapters of this monograph) that with a cautious conservative therapeutic approach, most people with neck pain and no obvious local lesions get well in time. The reviews of the anatomic, pathologic, and roentgenographic aspects of the cervical region provide a concise refresher course for physicians who have not had occasion to explore this area since their freshman year of medical school. But it will offer little to the neurologist, neurosurgeon, and orthopedist who are palpating and incising the area daily. Fully one third of the volume is devoted to the radiology of the cervical spine, with many large roentgenograms illustrating the more common disorders of the region. While the accompanying captions and strategically placed sketches are usually specific enough to guide the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Cervical Spondylosis: Its Early Diagnosis and Treatment.

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 129 (6) – Jun 1, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1972.00320060154044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract Cervical spondylosis is frequently a pain in the neck for the physician as well as the patient. It is comforting for both parties to learn (in the concluding chapters of this monograph) that with a cautious conservative therapeutic approach, most people with neck pain and no obvious local lesions get well in time. The reviews of the anatomic, pathologic, and roentgenographic aspects of the cervical region provide a concise refresher course for physicians who have not had occasion to explore this area since their freshman year of medical school. But it will offer little to the neurologist, neurosurgeon, and orthopedist who are palpating and incising the area daily. Fully one third of the volume is devoted to the radiology of the cervical spine, with many large roentgenograms illustrating the more common disorders of the region. While the accompanying captions and strategically placed sketches are usually specific enough to guide the

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1972

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