Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

CERTAIN ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION

CERTAIN ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION Abstract The subject of oxidation presents one of the most fascinating themes in the entire domain of chemistry. The various views which have been held regarding the nature of combustion and oxidation have always exercised a profound influence on chemical thought and on biological science and medicine. Modern views regarding the nature of oxidation date from the work of Lavoisier, who observed that, in the process of oxidation, oxygen adds itself to the substance oxidized, and that the resulting one or more products weigh more than the original material by exactly the weight of oxygen required to effect the oxidation. It is not within the scope of this lecture to recount the views which have been held regarding the mechanism of oxidation in general. It would also be quite futile to review the whole subject of vital oxidation in the time at our disposal. I shall therefore confine my remarks to References 1. Kastle and Loevenhart: Am. Chem. Jour. , 1901, xxvi, 539. 2. Loevenhart: Therap. Monatsch. , 1905, p. 426. 3. Meyer, Victor: Ber. d. deutsch. chem. Gesellsch. , 1892, xxv, 2632Crossref 4. 1893, xxvi, 1354, 1727 5. 1894, xxvii, 1600. 6. Grove and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1911, iii, 101. 7. Arkin: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1911, iii, 145. 8. Grove and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1911, iii, 131. 9. Eyster and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1913, v, 21. 10. Gasser and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1914, v, 239. 11. Stewart: Jour. of Physiol. , 1894, xv, 4. 12. Loevenhart: Arch. f. d. ges. Physiol. (Pflüger's) , 1913, cl, 379.Crossref 13. Gasser and Loevenhart: Jour. of Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1914, v, 239. 14. Verzár: Jour. Physiol. , 1912, xliv, 243. 15. Barcroft and Piper: Jour. of Physiol. , 1912, xliv, 359. 16. Hill, A. V.: Jour. Physiol. , 1913, xlvi, 28. 17. Bert, Paul: La pression barométrique, 1878, p. 1108 18. Compt. rend. Acad. , 1882, xciv, 805. 19. A description of this apparatus will soon be published. 20. Benedict: Deutsch. Arch. f. klin. Med. , 1912, cvii, 156. 21. Williams : Jour. Biol. Chem. , 1912, xii, 317. 22. A complete account of these experiments will soon be published. 23. Clowes and Redwood : Proc. Royal Soc. London , 1894, lvi, 2. 24. Hektoen, L.: Tr. Chicago Pathological Soc. , 1911, viii, 138. 25. Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1912, iii, 223 26. Jour. Am. Med. Assn. , 1912, lix, 1598Crossref 27. Ztschr. f. d. ges. exper. Med. , 1913, ii, 19, and oral communication. 28. Jacobi, Abraham: Tr. Med. Soc., New York , 1879, p. 365. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

CERTAIN ASPECTS OF BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume XV (6) – Jun 1, 1915

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/certain-aspects-of-biological-oxidation-UTWyaWHyb2
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1915 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0730-188X
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1915.00070250120009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The subject of oxidation presents one of the most fascinating themes in the entire domain of chemistry. The various views which have been held regarding the nature of combustion and oxidation have always exercised a profound influence on chemical thought and on biological science and medicine. Modern views regarding the nature of oxidation date from the work of Lavoisier, who observed that, in the process of oxidation, oxygen adds itself to the substance oxidized, and that the resulting one or more products weigh more than the original material by exactly the weight of oxygen required to effect the oxidation. It is not within the scope of this lecture to recount the views which have been held regarding the mechanism of oxidation in general. It would also be quite futile to review the whole subject of vital oxidation in the time at our disposal. I shall therefore confine my remarks to References 1. Kastle and Loevenhart: Am. Chem. Jour. , 1901, xxvi, 539. 2. Loevenhart: Therap. Monatsch. , 1905, p. 426. 3. Meyer, Victor: Ber. d. deutsch. chem. Gesellsch. , 1892, xxv, 2632Crossref 4. 1893, xxvi, 1354, 1727 5. 1894, xxvii, 1600. 6. Grove and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1911, iii, 101. 7. Arkin: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1911, iii, 145. 8. Grove and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1911, iii, 131. 9. Eyster and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1913, v, 21. 10. Gasser and Loevenhart: Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1914, v, 239. 11. Stewart: Jour. of Physiol. , 1894, xv, 4. 12. Loevenhart: Arch. f. d. ges. Physiol. (Pflüger's) , 1913, cl, 379.Crossref 13. Gasser and Loevenhart: Jour. of Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1914, v, 239. 14. Verzár: Jour. Physiol. , 1912, xliv, 243. 15. Barcroft and Piper: Jour. of Physiol. , 1912, xliv, 359. 16. Hill, A. V.: Jour. Physiol. , 1913, xlvi, 28. 17. Bert, Paul: La pression barométrique, 1878, p. 1108 18. Compt. rend. Acad. , 1882, xciv, 805. 19. A description of this apparatus will soon be published. 20. Benedict: Deutsch. Arch. f. klin. Med. , 1912, cvii, 156. 21. Williams : Jour. Biol. Chem. , 1912, xii, 317. 22. A complete account of these experiments will soon be published. 23. Clowes and Redwood : Proc. Royal Soc. London , 1894, lvi, 2. 24. Hektoen, L.: Tr. Chicago Pathological Soc. , 1911, viii, 138. 25. Jour. Pharmacol. and exper. Therap. , 1912, iii, 223 26. Jour. Am. Med. Assn. , 1912, lix, 1598Crossref 27. Ztschr. f. d. ges. exper. Med. , 1913, ii, 19, and oral communication. 28. Jacobi, Abraham: Tr. Med. Soc., New York , 1879, p. 365.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1915

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month