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CEREBRAL ELECTRIC RESPONSE TO INTERMITTENT PHOTIC STIMULATION IN AMBLYOPIA EX ANOPSIA: A Preliminary Report

CEREBRAL ELECTRIC RESPONSE TO INTERMITTENT PHOTIC STIMULATION IN AMBLYOPIA EX ANOPSIA: A... Abstract STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM AMBLYOPIA ex anopsia and the closely related phenomenon of suppression present problems which extend beyond purely ophthalmologic interest. In amblyopia and in suppression there has been provided a "natural" experimental situation in which a tissue showing no discernible pathologic change is affected by a reversible inhibition of its function.Inhibition of function is a general property of the nervous system. In the case of more or less transient suppression of central vision in one eye and in amblyopia ex anopsia, a situation obtains in which one aspect of the inhibitory process is readily accessible to investigation in the intact human organism.Some authors believe that the seat of the inhibition in amblyopia ex anopsia is in the retinal neurons; others are of the opinion that the seat is in the central nervous system. We incline toward the latter view, since a study of the dark-adaptation process References 1. Wald, G., and Burian, H. M.: The Dissociation of Form Vision and Light Perception in Strabismic Amblyopia , Am. J. Ophth. 27:950-963 ( (Sept.) ) 1944. 2. Monnier, M.: L'électro-rétinogramme de l'homme , Electroencephalog. & Clin. Neurophysiol. 1:87-109 ( (Feb.) ) 1949. 3. Callahan, A., and Redlich, F. C.: Electroencephalography and Ophthalmology , Am. J. Ophth. 29:1522-1533 ( (Dec.) ) 1946. 4. Dyer, D., and Bierman, E. O.: Cortical Potential Changes in Amblyopia ex Anopsia: A Preliminary Report , Am. J. Ophth. 33:1095-1098 ( (July) ) 1950. 5. Between the end of January, 1950, when this paper was read, and June 1, 1951, 6 additional "normal" persons and 32 additional patients with amblyopia ex anopsia were tested. 6. In later tests, higher frequencies (up to 19 flashes per second) were also employed. 7. Hill, J. D. N., and Parr, G.: Electroencephalography: A Symposium on Its Various Aspects , New York, The Macmillan Company, 1950, p. 381 8. Watson, C. W.: Unpublished observations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

CEREBRAL ELECTRIC RESPONSE TO INTERMITTENT PHOTIC STIMULATION IN AMBLYOPIA EX ANOPSIA: A Preliminary Report

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1952 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1952.00920010142002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM AMBLYOPIA ex anopsia and the closely related phenomenon of suppression present problems which extend beyond purely ophthalmologic interest. In amblyopia and in suppression there has been provided a "natural" experimental situation in which a tissue showing no discernible pathologic change is affected by a reversible inhibition of its function.Inhibition of function is a general property of the nervous system. In the case of more or less transient suppression of central vision in one eye and in amblyopia ex anopsia, a situation obtains in which one aspect of the inhibitory process is readily accessible to investigation in the intact human organism.Some authors believe that the seat of the inhibition in amblyopia ex anopsia is in the retinal neurons; others are of the opinion that the seat is in the central nervous system. We incline toward the latter view, since a study of the dark-adaptation process References 1. Wald, G., and Burian, H. M.: The Dissociation of Form Vision and Light Perception in Strabismic Amblyopia , Am. J. Ophth. 27:950-963 ( (Sept.) ) 1944. 2. Monnier, M.: L'électro-rétinogramme de l'homme , Electroencephalog. & Clin. Neurophysiol. 1:87-109 ( (Feb.) ) 1949. 3. Callahan, A., and Redlich, F. C.: Electroencephalography and Ophthalmology , Am. J. Ophth. 29:1522-1533 ( (Dec.) ) 1946. 4. Dyer, D., and Bierman, E. O.: Cortical Potential Changes in Amblyopia ex Anopsia: A Preliminary Report , Am. J. Ophth. 33:1095-1098 ( (July) ) 1950. 5. Between the end of January, 1950, when this paper was read, and June 1, 1951, 6 additional "normal" persons and 32 additional patients with amblyopia ex anopsia were tested. 6. In later tests, higher frequencies (up to 19 flashes per second) were also employed. 7. Hill, J. D. N., and Parr, G.: Electroencephalography: A Symposium on Its Various Aspects , New York, The Macmillan Company, 1950, p. 381 8. Watson, C. W.: Unpublished observations.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1952

References

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