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Cerebral Dominance

Cerebral Dominance Abstract To the Editor.— Albert et al, in "Cerebral Dominance for Consciousness" (Arch Neurol 33:453, 1976), suggest that their "findings lend support to the argument that hemispheric asymmetry may exist for consciousness as well as for other neurobehavioral phenomena." It appears from their brief report that focal unilateral lesions of the left hemisphere are more likely to produce a "reduced consciousness," providing consciousness is "defined" as a phenomenon of variable intensity, specifiable by grading (from low to high) arousability, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous and directed behavior. This seems quite reasonable. Nevertheless, their Table 3 shows that the level of consciousness for which patients showed the greatest difference and which, presumably, contributed most heavily to their statistical argument was "full consciousness" wherein patients were fully awake, alert, and attentive. In the context of known aspects of hemispheric function, it is possible that this weighting is of considerable importance. Thus, Sperry References 1. Sperry RW: Lateral specialization in the surgically separated hemispheres , in Schmitt FO, Worden FG (eds): The Neurosciences, Third Study Program . Cambridge, Mass, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1974, pp 5-19. 2. Kinsbourne M, Smith WL (eds): Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function . Springfield, Ill, Charles C Thomas Publisher, 1974. 3. Bogen JE: The other side of the brain. II. An appositional mind . Bull Los Angeles Neurol Soc 34:135-162, 1969. 4. Brown JW, Jaffe J: Hypothesis on cerebral dominance . Neuropsychology 13:107-110, 1975.Crossref 5. Ornstein RE: The Nature of Human Consciousness . San Francisco, WH Freeman & Co, 1973. 6. Penfield W: The Mystery of the Mind . Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1975. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Cerebral Dominance

Archives of Neurology , Volume 34 (1) – Jan 1, 1977

Cerebral Dominance

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Albert et al, in "Cerebral Dominance for Consciousness" (Arch Neurol 33:453, 1976), suggest that their "findings lend support to the argument that hemispheric asymmetry may exist for consciousness as well as for other neurobehavioral phenomena." It appears from their brief report that focal unilateral lesions of the left hemisphere are more likely to produce a "reduced consciousness," providing consciousness is "defined"...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1977.00500130080024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Albert et al, in "Cerebral Dominance for Consciousness" (Arch Neurol 33:453, 1976), suggest that their "findings lend support to the argument that hemispheric asymmetry may exist for consciousness as well as for other neurobehavioral phenomena." It appears from their brief report that focal unilateral lesions of the left hemisphere are more likely to produce a "reduced consciousness," providing consciousness is "defined" as a phenomenon of variable intensity, specifiable by grading (from low to high) arousability, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous and directed behavior. This seems quite reasonable. Nevertheless, their Table 3 shows that the level of consciousness for which patients showed the greatest difference and which, presumably, contributed most heavily to their statistical argument was "full consciousness" wherein patients were fully awake, alert, and attentive. In the context of known aspects of hemispheric function, it is possible that this weighting is of considerable importance. Thus, Sperry References 1. Sperry RW: Lateral specialization in the surgically separated hemispheres , in Schmitt FO, Worden FG (eds): The Neurosciences, Third Study Program . Cambridge, Mass, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press, 1974, pp 5-19. 2. Kinsbourne M, Smith WL (eds): Hemispheric Disconnection and Cerebral Function . Springfield, Ill, Charles C Thomas Publisher, 1974. 3. Bogen JE: The other side of the brain. II. An appositional mind . Bull Los Angeles Neurol Soc 34:135-162, 1969. 4. Brown JW, Jaffe J: Hypothesis on cerebral dominance . Neuropsychology 13:107-110, 1975.Crossref 5. Ornstein RE: The Nature of Human Consciousness . San Francisco, WH Freeman & Co, 1973. 6. Penfield W: The Mystery of the Mind . Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1975.

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1977

References