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CEREBRAL CIRCULATION: AFFERENT IMPULSES FROM THE BLOOD VESSELS OF THE PIA

CEREBRAL CIRCULATION: AFFERENT IMPULSES FROM THE BLOOD VESSELS OF THE PIA Abstract Since the cerebral circulation is dominated by the blood vessels of the pia mater, their activity is of major importance to the brain. That these vessels are richly supplied with nerves can no longer be questioned. Convincing data are available from both the histologic and the physiologic points of view. Histologically, it has been demonstrated that these vessels have about them and in their walls many nerve fibers and end-organs. Stöhr1 differentiated them into motor and sensory components, but Hassin2 did not feel justified in making this distinction. They agreed in stressing the significance of this nerve supply because of the importance of the pial vessels. Penfield3 found that not only the pial vessels, but also their intracerebral branches, are equipped with nerves. Physiologically, the knowledge of the function of these nerves and end-organs has been more or less limited to the demonstration of motor effects, viz., References 1. Stöhr, P.: Mikroskopische Anatomie des vegetativen Nervensystems , Berlin, Julius Springer, 1928, p. 177. 2. Hassin, G. B.: The Nerve Supply of the Cerebral Blood Vessels, in The Vegetative Nervous System , Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1930, p. 437. 3. Penfield, W.: Intracerebral Vascular Nerves , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 27:30 ( (Jan.) ) 1932. 4. Forbes, H. S., and Wolff, H. G.: The Cerebral Circulation: III. The Vasomotor Control of the Cerebral Vessels , Arch. Neurol & Psychiat. 19:1057 ( (June) ) 1928. 5. Penfield, W.: Personal communication. 6. Stöhr (footnote 1). 7. Hassin (footnote 2). 8. Hitz, J. B., and Kammer, A. G.: The Effects of Stimulation of Cerebral Blood Vessels 9. Leake, J. P.; Loevenhart, A. S., and Muehlberger, C. W.: Dilatation of Cerebral Blood Vessels as a Factor in Headache , J. A. M. A. 88:1076 ( (April 2) ) 1927. 10. Landis, C., and DeWick, H. N.: The Electrical Phenomena of the Skin , Psychol. Bull. 26:64, 1929. 11. Levine, M.: Psychogalvanic Reaction to Painful Stimuli in Hypnotic and Hysterical Anesthesia , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 46:331 ( (May) ) 1930. 12. Richter, C. P.: Personal communication. 13. Langworthy, O. R., and Richter, C. P.: The Influence of Efferent Cerebral Pathways upon the Sympathetic Nervous System , Brain 53:178, 1930. 14. Richter, C. P.: A Study of the Electrical Skin Resistance and the Psychogalvanic Reflex in a Case of Unilateral Sweating , Brain 50:216, 1927. 15. Cannon, W. B.: The Sympathetic Division of the Autonomic System in Relation to Homeostasis , in The Vegetative Nervous System , Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1930, p. 181. 16. Leake, C. D.; Loevenhart, S., and Muehlberger, C. W.: Dilatation of Cerebral Blood Vessels as a Factor in Headache , J. A. M. A. 88:1076 ( (April 2) ) 1927. 17. Wolff, H. G.: The Cerebral Circulation, in Piersol: Encyclopedia of Medicine, in press. 18. Wolff (footnote 14). 19. Penfield, W., and Foerster, O.: The Structural Basis of Traumatic Epilepsy and Results of Radical Operation , Brain 55:99 ( (July) ) 1930. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

CEREBRAL CIRCULATION: AFFERENT IMPULSES FROM THE BLOOD VESSELS OF THE PIA

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1932 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1932.02240010148011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Since the cerebral circulation is dominated by the blood vessels of the pia mater, their activity is of major importance to the brain. That these vessels are richly supplied with nerves can no longer be questioned. Convincing data are available from both the histologic and the physiologic points of view. Histologically, it has been demonstrated that these vessels have about them and in their walls many nerve fibers and end-organs. Stöhr1 differentiated them into motor and sensory components, but Hassin2 did not feel justified in making this distinction. They agreed in stressing the significance of this nerve supply because of the importance of the pial vessels. Penfield3 found that not only the pial vessels, but also their intracerebral branches, are equipped with nerves. Physiologically, the knowledge of the function of these nerves and end-organs has been more or less limited to the demonstration of motor effects, viz., References 1. Stöhr, P.: Mikroskopische Anatomie des vegetativen Nervensystems , Berlin, Julius Springer, 1928, p. 177. 2. Hassin, G. B.: The Nerve Supply of the Cerebral Blood Vessels, in The Vegetative Nervous System , Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1930, p. 437. 3. Penfield, W.: Intracerebral Vascular Nerves , Arch. Neurol. & Psychiat. 27:30 ( (Jan.) ) 1932. 4. Forbes, H. S., and Wolff, H. G.: The Cerebral Circulation: III. The Vasomotor Control of the Cerebral Vessels , Arch. Neurol & Psychiat. 19:1057 ( (June) ) 1928. 5. Penfield, W.: Personal communication. 6. Stöhr (footnote 1). 7. Hassin (footnote 2). 8. Hitz, J. B., and Kammer, A. G.: The Effects of Stimulation of Cerebral Blood Vessels 9. Leake, J. P.; Loevenhart, A. S., and Muehlberger, C. W.: Dilatation of Cerebral Blood Vessels as a Factor in Headache , J. A. M. A. 88:1076 ( (April 2) ) 1927. 10. Landis, C., and DeWick, H. N.: The Electrical Phenomena of the Skin , Psychol. Bull. 26:64, 1929. 11. Levine, M.: Psychogalvanic Reaction to Painful Stimuli in Hypnotic and Hysterical Anesthesia , Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 46:331 ( (May) ) 1930. 12. Richter, C. P.: Personal communication. 13. Langworthy, O. R., and Richter, C. P.: The Influence of Efferent Cerebral Pathways upon the Sympathetic Nervous System , Brain 53:178, 1930. 14. Richter, C. P.: A Study of the Electrical Skin Resistance and the Psychogalvanic Reflex in a Case of Unilateral Sweating , Brain 50:216, 1927. 15. Cannon, W. B.: The Sympathetic Division of the Autonomic System in Relation to Homeostasis , in The Vegetative Nervous System , Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, 1930, p. 181. 16. Leake, C. D.; Loevenhart, S., and Muehlberger, C. W.: Dilatation of Cerebral Blood Vessels as a Factor in Headache , J. A. M. A. 88:1076 ( (April 2) ) 1927. 17. Wolff, H. G.: The Cerebral Circulation, in Piersol: Encyclopedia of Medicine, in press. 18. Wolff (footnote 14). 19. Penfield, W., and Foerster, O.: The Structural Basis of Traumatic Epilepsy and Results of Radical Operation , Brain 55:99 ( (July) ) 1930.

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1932

References

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