Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease DIGESTIVE DISORDERS The Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE eliac disease (CD) is a common digestive disease. It is also known as celiac sprue, gluten-sensitive Centeropathy,ornontropicalsprue.Inindividualswith CD, gluten (a protein in wheat, barley, and rye) damages the small intestine and results in difficulty absorbing Large intestine nutrients from food. Up to 1 in 113 people in the United States have CD. The risk is higher (1 in 22) in people with a first-degree relative with CD. The cause of CD is unknown, Small intestine but environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors all contribute. The October 12, 2011, issue of JAMA includes anarticleaboutCD.ThisPatientPageisbasedononeoriginally published in the September 16, 2009, issue of JAMA. CAUSE AND PATHOLOGY It is believed that there is an immunologic (having to do with INSIDE OF I N S SMA SMALL INTESTINE LL the immune system) aspect to CD. Antibodies are normal parts (LU (LUMEN) of the body that fight against something trying to invade it; autoantibodies are abnormally directed against one’s own body. Healthy individual Individual with CD Indivi Several autoantibodies are found in the blood of patients with CD. These autoantibodies seem to be a result of CD. There is also a genetic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Celiac Disease

Abstract

DIGESTIVE DISORDERS The Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE eliac disease (CD) is a common digestive disease. It is also known as celiac sprue, gluten-sensitive Centeropathy,ornontropicalsprue.Inindividualswith CD, gluten (a protein in wheat, barley, and rye) damages the small intestine and results in difficulty absorbing Large intestine nutrients from food. Up to 1 in 113 people in the United States have CD. The risk is higher (1 in 22) in people with a first-degree...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/celiac-disease-XPgO8Nc94b
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.306.14.1614
pmid
21990305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DIGESTIVE DISORDERS The Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA PATIENT PAGE eliac disease (CD) is a common digestive disease. It is also known as celiac sprue, gluten-sensitive Centeropathy,ornontropicalsprue.Inindividualswith CD, gluten (a protein in wheat, barley, and rye) damages the small intestine and results in difficulty absorbing Large intestine nutrients from food. Up to 1 in 113 people in the United States have CD. The risk is higher (1 in 22) in people with a first-degree relative with CD. The cause of CD is unknown, Small intestine but environmental, immunologic, and genetic factors all contribute. The October 12, 2011, issue of JAMA includes anarticleaboutCD.ThisPatientPageisbasedononeoriginally published in the September 16, 2009, issue of JAMA. CAUSE AND PATHOLOGY It is believed that there is an immunologic (having to do with INSIDE OF I N S SMA SMALL INTESTINE LL the immune system) aspect to CD. Antibodies are normal parts (LU (LUMEN) of the body that fight against something trying to invade it; autoantibodies are abnormally directed against one’s own body. Healthy individual Individual with CD Indivi Several autoantibodies are found in the blood of patients with CD. These autoantibodies seem to be a result of CD. There is also a genetic

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 12, 2011

There are no references for this article.