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Cats as a Factor in the Propagation of Infectious Diseases.

Cats as a Factor in the Propagation of Infectious Diseases. Worcester, Mass., Aug. 2, 1905. To the Editor: —A research study is being made at Clark University in reference to the possible causal relation of cats as a factor in propagating infectious diseases, especially those of children. I wish to make an appeal through your columns to the readers of The Journal who have observed any communication of disease from cats to human beings and to ask them kindly to put me in possession of such facts. This would aid materially in deciding to what extent the cat may be a source of danger in the transmission of communicable diseases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Cats as a Factor in the Propagation of Infectious Diseases.

JAMA , Volume XLV (10) – Sep 2, 1905

Cats as a Factor in the Propagation of Infectious Diseases.

Abstract


Worcester, Mass., Aug. 2, 1905.

To the Editor:
—A research study is being made at Clark University in reference to the possible causal relation of cats as a factor in propagating infectious diseases, especially those of children.
I wish to make an appeal through your columns to the readers of The Journal who have observed any communication of disease from cats to human beings and to ask them kindly to put me in possession of such facts....
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.02510100062016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Worcester, Mass., Aug. 2, 1905. To the Editor: —A research study is being made at Clark University in reference to the possible causal relation of cats as a factor in propagating infectious diseases, especially those of children. I wish to make an appeal through your columns to the readers of The Journal who have observed any communication of disease from cats to human beings and to ask them kindly to put me in possession of such facts. This would aid materially in deciding to what extent the cat may be a source of danger in the transmission of communicable diseases.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 2, 1905

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