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Carotid Artery Protection With Levator Scapulae Muscle

Carotid Artery Protection With Levator Scapulae Muscle Abstract PROTECTION of the carotid artery following radical neck dissection is a major concern of the head and neck surgeon, especially in those patients in whom impaired wound healing is anticipated. These include debilitated patients, those with prior irradiation, and those with preoperative infection or orocutaneous fistula. The various methods currently employed for covering the carotid artery, with the advantages and disadvantages of each, have been reviewed by Conley.1 Each is applicable in certain situations, depending on the mobility of the artery and the portion one desires to protect. However, no one method has proven satisfactory in all situations. Transposition of the levator scapulae muscle was first advocated by Staley in 1961.2 A modification of this method was demonstrated by Schweitzer in 19623 where the muscle was pedicled superiorly and sutured over the carotid bulb. Pedicles from the scalene muscles could then be used to cover the remainder References 1. Conley, J.J.: Carotid Artery Protection , Arch Otolaryng 75:60-65, 1962.Crossref 2. Staley, C.J.: A Muscle Cover for the Carotid Artery After Radical Neck Dissection , Amer J Surg 102:815-817, 1961.Crossref 3. Schweitzer, R.J.: Use of Muscle Flaps for Protection of Carotid Artery After Radical Neck Dissection , Ann Surg 156:811-818, 1962.Crossref 4. Gray's Anatomy , ed 26, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1954, p 655. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Carotid Artery Protection With Levator Scapulae Muscle

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1966.00760030200015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract PROTECTION of the carotid artery following radical neck dissection is a major concern of the head and neck surgeon, especially in those patients in whom impaired wound healing is anticipated. These include debilitated patients, those with prior irradiation, and those with preoperative infection or orocutaneous fistula. The various methods currently employed for covering the carotid artery, with the advantages and disadvantages of each, have been reviewed by Conley.1 Each is applicable in certain situations, depending on the mobility of the artery and the portion one desires to protect. However, no one method has proven satisfactory in all situations. Transposition of the levator scapulae muscle was first advocated by Staley in 1961.2 A modification of this method was demonstrated by Schweitzer in 19623 where the muscle was pedicled superiorly and sutured over the carotid bulb. Pedicles from the scalene muscles could then be used to cover the remainder References 1. Conley, J.J.: Carotid Artery Protection , Arch Otolaryng 75:60-65, 1962.Crossref 2. Staley, C.J.: A Muscle Cover for the Carotid Artery After Radical Neck Dissection , Amer J Surg 102:815-817, 1961.Crossref 3. Schweitzer, R.J.: Use of Muscle Flaps for Protection of Carotid Artery After Radical Neck Dissection , Ann Surg 156:811-818, 1962.Crossref 4. Gray's Anatomy , ed 26, Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1954, p 655.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1966

References

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