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Caring for an Aging Population

Caring for an Aging Population Uncomposed text in Xyvision Standard Format Page 1 EditorialEditorialsEditorials represent the opinions of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association.Caring for an Aging PopulationCall for PapersCall for Papers on AgingMargaret A.WinkerMDCatherine D.DeAngelisMD, MPHhe aging of the world population will affect not only societies worldwide, but health care professionals who care for them, the families of aged adults, and of course the aged individuals. According to the United Nations, “Population ageing is unprecedented, without parallel in the history of humanity....By 2050, the number of older persons in the world will exceed the number of young for the first time in history.” The number of individuals worldwide aged 60 years or older will increase from 1 in 10 currently to 1 in 5 by 2050. In addition, the causes of death among older adults are changing. As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 2006 to 2007, the most recent data available, declines in age-adjusted death rates in the United States were observed for influenza and pneumonia (8.4%), homicide (6.5%), unintentional injuries (5%), heart disease (4.7%), stroke (4.6%), diabetes (3.9%), hypertension (2.7%), and cancer (1.8%). Alzheimer disease rose from the seventh to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Caring for an Aging Population

JAMA , Volume 303 (5) – Feb 3, 2010

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.46
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Uncomposed text in Xyvision Standard Format Page 1 EditorialEditorialsEditorials represent the opinions of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association.Caring for an Aging PopulationCall for PapersCall for Papers on AgingMargaret A.WinkerMDCatherine D.DeAngelisMD, MPHhe aging of the world population will affect not only societies worldwide, but health care professionals who care for them, the families of aged adults, and of course the aged individuals. According to the United Nations, “Population ageing is unprecedented, without parallel in the history of humanity....By 2050, the number of older persons in the world will exceed the number of young for the first time in history.” The number of individuals worldwide aged 60 years or older will increase from 1 in 10 currently to 1 in 5 by 2050. In addition, the causes of death among older adults are changing. As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from 2006 to 2007, the most recent data available, declines in age-adjusted death rates in the United States were observed for influenza and pneumonia (8.4%), homicide (6.5%), unintentional injuries (5%), heart disease (4.7%), stroke (4.6%), diabetes (3.9%), hypertension (2.7%), and cancer (1.8%). Alzheimer disease rose from the seventh to the

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 3, 2010

References