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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival-Reply

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival-Reply Abstract Lewis makes an important point that the apparent failure of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) outcome predictors to predict CPR outcome in the study by Rosenberg et al1 may have been due to a bias that resulted from the proper application of DNA orders that, in turn, resulted in the exclusion of those least likely to survive among the attempted CPR population. If this were the case, we would hope that Rosenberg et al would enlighten us as to the manner in which this selection was accomplished. There is no mention, however, by Rosenberg et al that any unusual application of the do-not-resuscitate process was in place at either one or both of the hospitals examined. Indeed, there was a rather wide variation from hospital A to hospital B in survival of resuscitation (Table 21) and in survival to discharge (Table 31) in a number of the subgroups analyzed. References 1. Rosenberg M, Wang C, Hoffman-Wilde S, Hickham D. Results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation: failure to predict survival in two community hospitals . Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1370-1375.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival-Reply

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 154 (2) – Jan 24, 1994

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Survival-Reply

Abstract

Abstract Lewis makes an important point that the apparent failure of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) outcome predictors to predict CPR outcome in the study by Rosenberg et al1 may have been due to a bias that resulted from the proper application of DNA orders that, in turn, resulted in the exclusion of those least likely to survive among the attempted CPR population. If this were the case, we would hope that Rosenberg et al would enlighten us as to the manner in which this selection was...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1994.00420020151021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Lewis makes an important point that the apparent failure of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) outcome predictors to predict CPR outcome in the study by Rosenberg et al1 may have been due to a bias that resulted from the proper application of DNA orders that, in turn, resulted in the exclusion of those least likely to survive among the attempted CPR population. If this were the case, we would hope that Rosenberg et al would enlighten us as to the manner in which this selection was accomplished. There is no mention, however, by Rosenberg et al that any unusual application of the do-not-resuscitate process was in place at either one or both of the hospitals examined. Indeed, there was a rather wide variation from hospital A to hospital B in survival of resuscitation (Table 21) and in survival to discharge (Table 31) in a number of the subgroups analyzed. References 1. Rosenberg M, Wang C, Hoffman-Wilde S, Hickham D. Results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation: failure to predict survival in two community hospitals . Arch Intern Med. 1993;153:1370-1375.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 24, 1994

References