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Carbon Dioxide vs Air in Pneumoperitoneum

Carbon Dioxide vs Air in Pneumoperitoneum Abstract To the Editor.—Astudillo et al1 recently reported that pneumoperitoneum is a valuable adjunct as a preparatory technique prior to repair of ventral hernias. However, the use of air for this procedure should be regarded with unease. Reports of air embolism from the introduction of air into the peritoneum, either diagnostically or surreptitiously, has the potential for a fatal outcome. Carbon dioxide has been used for more recent diagnostic procedures, such as laparoscopy, and embolic accidents with this gas are not likely to cause injury. Perhaps, with the increasing use of induced pneumoperitoneum as an adjunct to repair of ventral hernias, the danger of using air as the inflating gas should stimulate the singular use of a rapidly absorbed and excreted gas such as carbon dioxide. References 1. Astudillo R, Merrell R, Sánchez J, et al: Ventral herniorrhaphy aided by pneumoperitoneum . Arch Surg 1986;121:935-940.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Carbon Dioxide vs Air in Pneumoperitoneum

Archives of Surgery , Volume 122 (6) – Jun 1, 1987

Carbon Dioxide vs Air in Pneumoperitoneum

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—Astudillo et al1 recently reported that pneumoperitoneum is a valuable adjunct as a preparatory technique prior to repair of ventral hernias. However, the use of air for this procedure should be regarded with unease. Reports of air embolism from the introduction of air into the peritoneum, either diagnostically or surreptitiously, has the potential for a fatal outcome. Carbon dioxide has been used for more recent diagnostic procedures, such as laparoscopy, and...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1987.01400180118025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—Astudillo et al1 recently reported that pneumoperitoneum is a valuable adjunct as a preparatory technique prior to repair of ventral hernias. However, the use of air for this procedure should be regarded with unease. Reports of air embolism from the introduction of air into the peritoneum, either diagnostically or surreptitiously, has the potential for a fatal outcome. Carbon dioxide has been used for more recent diagnostic procedures, such as laparoscopy, and embolic accidents with this gas are not likely to cause injury. Perhaps, with the increasing use of induced pneumoperitoneum as an adjunct to repair of ventral hernias, the danger of using air as the inflating gas should stimulate the singular use of a rapidly absorbed and excreted gas such as carbon dioxide. References 1. Astudillo R, Merrell R, Sánchez J, et al: Ventral herniorrhaphy aided by pneumoperitoneum . Arch Surg 1986;121:935-940.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1987

References