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Cancer of Larynx, Pharynx, and Upper Cervical Esophagus

Cancer of Larynx, Pharynx, and Upper Cervical Esophagus Introduction In general, radical surgery has been used more successfully for advanced cancer than irradiation therapy. When total laryngectomy is performed the anatomic area of larynx, pharynx and upper cervical esophagus becomes converted into a passageway for food and voice production by the newly created pharyngoesophagus. However, permanent tracheostomy for the patient leaves much to be desired, and the mucous secretions are unpleasant as are bleeding and crusting. The social stigma that the patient may feel and the poor quality or even lack of voice in some instances are all familiar complaints. Aggressive surgical approaches for malignancies in this area have been found in many instances to leave little room for a more conservative approach to the problem. There are some who believe that conservation of function of the larynx after surgical eradication of selected supraglottic and laryngopharyngeal lesions is not possible. Varied surgical methods of treatment are necessary only http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngolog American Medical Association

Cancer of Larynx, Pharynx, and Upper Cervical Esophagus

Archives of Otolaryngolog , Volume 72 (1) – Jul 1, 1960

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0003-9977
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1960.00740010070012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction In general, radical surgery has been used more successfully for advanced cancer than irradiation therapy. When total laryngectomy is performed the anatomic area of larynx, pharynx and upper cervical esophagus becomes converted into a passageway for food and voice production by the newly created pharyngoesophagus. However, permanent tracheostomy for the patient leaves much to be desired, and the mucous secretions are unpleasant as are bleeding and crusting. The social stigma that the patient may feel and the poor quality or even lack of voice in some instances are all familiar complaints. Aggressive surgical approaches for malignancies in this area have been found in many instances to leave little room for a more conservative approach to the problem. There are some who believe that conservation of function of the larynx after surgical eradication of selected supraglottic and laryngopharyngeal lesions is not possible. Varied surgical methods of treatment are necessary only

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1960

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