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Cancer Crusade: The Story of the National Cancer Act of 1971

Cancer Crusade: The Story of the National Cancer Act of 1971 In late 1971 President Nixon signed into law an act elevating the role of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to that of a "first among equals" among the prestigious research arms of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NCI was granted a budgetary bypass mechanism wherein its director was to submit his annual budget request directly to the President without seeking approval from the NIH and the parent cabinet department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Since the 1971 Act, funds appropriated to the NCI have almost quadrupled by fiscal 1977 to nearly $1 billion a year. Richard Rettig has written a fascinating work that details how all this came about, what its present-day effects on both the NCI and overall biomedical research are, and whither this legislation may lead. More important, perhaps, he details the legislative history of the National Cancer Act, indicating the careful preparation and organization of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Cancer Crusade: The Story of the National Cancer Act of 1971

JAMA , Volume 239 (19) – May 12, 1978

Cancer Crusade: The Story of the National Cancer Act of 1971

Abstract


In late 1971 President Nixon signed into law an act elevating the role of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to that of a "first among equals" among the prestigious research arms of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NCI was granted a budgetary bypass mechanism wherein its director was to submit his annual budget request directly to the President without seeking approval from the NIH and the parent cabinet department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Since the 1971 Act,...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1978.03280460108039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In late 1971 President Nixon signed into law an act elevating the role of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to that of a "first among equals" among the prestigious research arms of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The NCI was granted a budgetary bypass mechanism wherein its director was to submit his annual budget request directly to the President without seeking approval from the NIH and the parent cabinet department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Since the 1971 Act, funds appropriated to the NCI have almost quadrupled by fiscal 1977 to nearly $1 billion a year. Richard Rettig has written a fascinating work that details how all this came about, what its present-day effects on both the NCI and overall biomedical research are, and whither this legislation may lead. More important, perhaps, he details the legislative history of the National Cancer Act, indicating the careful preparation and organization of

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 12, 1978

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